Greenpeat - The Change We Can Make

Eco industry for green buildings

The Plan

  The plan I have devised is to take a small area of poor quality, saturated acid land, up to 20 acres, bordered by strips of better, less acid land up to a further 20 acres, although the scheme could well be established on a much smaller area. On this would be created a pilot project for the growing of various green products. Typically the site  would be level, low-lying, and surrounded by open drainage ditches. The bottom of these drains would be full of stagnant water for much of the year, heavily polluted with nitrates, phosphates, pathogens like crypto spiridium and e-coli, and many other organic and chemical substances accumulated from the surrounding district. Heavy rain and flood conditions would periodically flush this poison into the larger watercourses and rivers.
     Within 3 years I would expect to start harvesting several commercial crops and up to 7 years would see the full development of several more. The total achievements from the site would be as follows:

Renewable fuel with negative carbon footprint.
Green construction materials.
Research and development of green buildings.
A science and technology centre.
A website for the sharing of knowledge, skills and ideas.
Tourism.
Skills and craft training and application.
Low energy farming and harvesting.
Natural energy processing and manufacturing.
Allotments and therapy gardens.
Visitor centre.
Wildlife centre.
Carbon-negative food production.
Waste treatment.
Purification of ground water and environment.
Centre for culture and heritage.

     The stagnant drains would be led into a small collection lake and from there would be circulated, ideally by wind pump, through a series of gravity-fed terraced reedbeds back to the lake.  This system would act as a flood buffer and would progressively cleanse the water through the reed roots. With the reduction of excessive fertilizers, reed quality would improve towards the final beds. The poorer quality reed would be utilised for fuel chaff or building insulation as in the prototype structure I have designed.

     Acid-tolerant reed and coppice would be at the centre of the system. Other crops would be on the border in more neutral soil. Short term produce would be thatching reed and renewable fuel from willow (investment return possibly within two years). Further fuel coppice could take between 3 to 7 years. Food crops could be from 2 years onwards up to 400 years depending on the crop. Reed will grow from the same roots every year, willow up to 7 years before becoming tired, but very easily propogated.

     Fuel crops are low level, low return, but commercially stable, and will become more so as the green impact bites globally. Research and development will take the quality end of the crop and turn it into high spec., valuable standardised building sections, totally green and sustainable, for the construction of prefabricated homes both for Ireland and for export. This will increase the value of the crop considerably. Modern scientific monitoring of the first prototype house will be carried out, to ascertain its durability and eco value, its thermal insulation properties, and its commercial viability. A similar scientific approach will be taken towards the cleansing of the environment and the benefits of the system for wildlife.

     Presently a considerable importation occurs annually of thatching reed and straw. This scheme would not only reduce imports but could produce exports. Reed and coppice timber has far greater potential than just thatching, and this should be explored.
 
     Training in traditional skills and agricultural methods would be central to the scheme, as would be the marriage of these green skills and materials with 21st century technology and design.

     The use of wind or water power would be employed for basic processing of fuel or wood pellets wherever possible.

     A storage and distribution centre would be established.

     The central system of water flow and drainage, once set up, could allow for sideways expansion of the plan, land space permitting, without the need for much further expense in the infrastructure, and the model, once proven, could be replicated any number of times throughout the country, but especially on otherwise-unproductive areas such as exhausted Bord na Mona turf bogs and boggy Coillte land. From quite small to very large areas would work, especially with the central collection and distribution warehouses to handle the national crop. Small farmers with areas of poor land could benefit greatly. Those research crops from the bordering fields which showed the best potential would be further developed either adjacently or on separate sites. The potential for wealth and jobs creation is vast, as is the environmental and ecological benefit from the scheme. Initial start-up costs would be very modest, and growth would be controllable. Each module would be small compared with the national scheme of the future, and as such the whole scheme would not fail due to one factor, such as rising fossil fuel costs. Massive single businesses, while financially very successful, are also prone to sudden catastrophic collapse. This scheme would start all from the same point, that is the growing of cellulosic materials, but would have sufficient diverse outlets to protect the system as a whole. 
  The plan I have devised is to take a small area of poor quality, saturated acid land, up to 20 acres, bordered by strips of better, less acid land up to a further 20 acres, although the scheme could well be established on a much smaller area. On this would be created a pilot project for the growing of various green products. Typically the site  would be level, low-lying, and surrounded by open drainage ditches. The bottom of these drains would be full of stagnant water for much of the year, heavily polluted with nitrates, phosphates, pathogens like crypto spiridium and e-coli, and many other organic and chemical substances accumulated from the surrounding district. Heavy rain and flood conditions would periodically flush this poison into the larger watercourses and rivers.
     Within 3 years I would expect to start harvesting several commercial crops and up to 7 years would see the full development of several more. The total achievements from the site would be as follows:

Renewable fuel with negative carbon footprint.
Green construction materials.
Research and development of green buildings.
A science and technology centre.
A website for the sharing of knowledge, skills and ideas.
Tourism.
Skills and craft training and application.
Low energy farming and harvesting.
Natural energy processing and manufacturing.
Allotments and therapy gardens.
Visitor centre.
Wildlife centre.
Carbon-negative food production.
Waste treatment.
Purification of ground water and environment.
Centre for culture and heritage.

     The stagnant drains would be led into a small collection lake and from there would be circulated, ideally by wind pump, through a series of gravity-fed terraced reedbeds back to the lake.  This system would act as a flood buffer and would progressively cleanse the water through the reed roots. With the reduction of excessive fertilizers, reed quality would improve towards the final beds. The poorer quality reed would be utilised for fuel chaff or building insulation as in the prototype structure I have designed.

     Acid-tolerant reed and coppice would be at the centre of the system. Other crops would be on the border in more neutral soil. Short term produce would be thatching reed and renewable fuel from willow (investment return possibly within two years). Further fuel coppice could take between 3 to 7 years. Food crops could be from 2 years onwards up to 400 years depending on the crop. Reed will grow from the same roots every year, willow up to 7 years before becoming tired, but very easily propogated.

     Fuel crops are low level, low return, but commercially stable, and will become more so as the green impact bites globally. Research and development will take the quality end of the crop and turn it into high spec., valuable standardised building sections, totally green and sustainable, for the construction of prefabricated homes both for Ireland and for export. This will increase the value of the crop considerably. Modern scientific monitoring of the first prototype house will be carried out, to ascertain its durability and eco value, its thermal insulation properties, and its commercial viability. A similar scientific approach will be taken towards the cleansing of the environment and the benefits of the system for wildlife.

     Presently a considerable importation occurs annually of thatching reed and straw. This scheme would not only reduce imports but could produce exports. Reed and coppice timber has far greater potential than just thatching, and this should be explored.
 
     Training in traditional skills and agricultural methods would be central to the scheme, as would be the marriage of these green skills and materials with 21st century technology and design.

     The use of wind or water power would be employed for basic processing of fuel or wood pellets wherever possible.

     A storage and distribution centre would be established.

     The central system of water flow and drainage, once set up, could allow for sideways expansion of the plan, land space permitting, without the need for much further expense in the infrastructure, and the model, once proven, could be replicated any number of times throughout the country, but especially on otherwise-unproductive areas such as exhausted Bord na Mona turf bogs and boggy Coillte land. From quite small to very large areas would work, especially with the central collection and distribution warehouses to handle the national crop. Small farmers with areas of poor land could benefit greatly. Those research crops from the bordering fields which showed the best potential would be further developed either adjacently or on separate sites. The potential for wealth and jobs creation is vast, as is the environmental and ecological benefit from the scheme. Initial start-up costs would be very modest, and growth would be controllable. Each module would be small compared with the national scheme of the future, and as such the whole scheme would not fail due to one factor, such as rising fossil fuel costs. Massive single businesses, while financially very successful, are also prone to sudden catastrophic collapse. This scheme would start all from the same point, that is the growing of cellulosic materials, but would have sufficient diverse outlets to protect the system as a whole. 
  The plan I have devised is to take a small area of poor quality, saturated acid land, up to 20 acres, bordered by strips of better, less acid land up to a further 20 acres, although the scheme could well be established on a much smaller area. On this would be created a pilot project for the growing of various green products. Typically the site  would be level, low-lying, and surrounded by open drainage ditches. The bottom of these drains would be full of stagnant water for much of the year, heavily polluted with nitrates, phosphates, pathogens like crypto spiridium and e-coli, and many other organic and chemical substances accumulated from the surrounding district. Heavy rain and flood conditions would periodically flush this poison into the larger watercourses and rivers.
     Within 3 years I would expect to start harvesting several commercial crops and up to 7 years would see the full development of several more. The total achievements from the site would be as follows:

Renewable fuel with negative carbon footprint.
Green construction materials.
Research and development of green buildings.
A science and technology centre.
A website for the sharing of knowledge, skills and ideas.
Tourism.
Skills and craft training and application.
Low energy farming and harvesting.
Natural energy processing and manufacturing.
Allotments and therapy gardens.
Visitor centre.
Wildlife centre.
Carbon-negative food production.
Waste treatment.
Purification of ground water and environment.
Centre for culture and heritage.

     The stagnant drains would be led into a small collection lake and from there would be circulated, ideally by wind pump, through a series of gravity-fed terraced reedbeds back to the lake.  This system would act as a flood buffer and would progressively cleanse the water through the reed roots. With the reduction of excessive fertilizers, reed quality would improve towards the final beds. The poorer quality reed would be utilised for fuel chaff or building insulation as in the prototype structure I have designed.

     Acid-tolerant reed and coppice would be at the centre of the system. Other crops would be on the border in more neutral soil. Short term produce would be thatching reed and renewable fuel from willow (investment return possibly within two years). Further fuel coppice could take between 3 to 7 years. Food crops could be from 2 years onwards up to 400 years depending on the crop. Reed will grow from the same roots every year, willow up to 7 years before becoming tired, but very easily propogated.

     Fuel crops are low level, low return, but commercially stable, and will become more so as the green impact bites globally. Research and development will take the quality end of the crop and turn it into high spec., valuable standardised building sections, totally green and sustainable, for the construction of prefabricated homes both for Ireland and for export. This will increase the value of the crop considerably. Modern scientific monitoring of the first prototype house will be carried out, to ascertain its durability and eco value, its thermal insulation properties, and its commercial viability. A similar scientific approach will be taken towards the cleansing of the environment and the benefits of the system for wildlife.

     Presently a considerable importation occurs annually of thatching reed and straw. This scheme would not only reduce imports but could produce exports. Reed and coppice timber has far greater potential than just thatching, and this should be explored.
 
     Training in traditional skills and agricultural methods would be central to the scheme, as would be the marriage of these green skills and materials with 21st century technology and design.

     The use of wind or water power would be employed for basic processing of fuel or wood pellets wherever possible.

     A storage and distribution centre would be established.

     The central system of water flow and drainage, once set up, could allow for sideways expansion of the plan, land space permitting, without the need for much further expense in the infrastructure, and the model, once proven, could be replicated any number of times throughout the country, but especially on otherwise-unproductive areas such as exhausted Bord na Mona turf bogs and boggy Coillte land. From quite small to very large areas would work, especially with the central collection and distribution warehouses to handle the national crop. Small farmers with areas of poor land could benefit greatly. Those research crops from the bordering fields which showed the best potential would be further developed either adjacently or on separate sites. The potential for wealth and jobs creation is vast, as is the environmental and ecological benefit from the scheme. Initial start-up costs would be very modest, and growth would be controllable. Each module would be small compared with the national scheme of the future, and as such the whole scheme would not fail due to one factor, such as rising fossil fuel costs. Massive single businesses, while financially very successful, are also prone to sudden catastrophic collapse. This scheme would start all from the same point, that is the growing of cellulosic materials, but would have sufficient diverse outlets to protect the system as a whole. 
  The plan I have devised is to take a small area of poor quality, saturated acid land, up to 20 acres, bordered by strips of better, less acid land up to a further 20 acres, although the scheme could well be established on a much smaller area. On this would be created a pilot project for the growing of various green products. Typically the site  would be level, low-lying, and surrounded by open drainage ditches. The bottom of these drains would be full of stagnant water for much of the year, heavily polluted with nitrates, phosphates, pathogens like crypto spiridium and e-coli, and many other organic and chemical substances accumulated from the surrounding district. Heavy rain and flood conditions would periodically flush this poison into the larger watercourses and rivers.
     Within 3 years I would expect to start harvesting several commercial crops and up to 7 years would see the full development of several more. The total achievements from the site would be as follows:

Renewable fuel with negative carbon footprint.
Green construction materials.
Research and development of green buildings.
A science and technology centre.
A website for the sharing of knowledge, skills and ideas.
Tourism.
Skills and craft training and application.
Low energy farming and harvesting.
Natural energy processing and manufacturing.
Allotments and therapy gardens.
Visitor centre.
Wildlife centre.
Carbon-negative food production.
Waste treatment.
Purification of ground water and environment.
Centre for culture and heritage.

     The stagnant drains would be led into a small collection lake and from there would be circulated, ideally by wind pump, through a series of gravity-fed terraced reedbeds back to the lake.  This system would act as a flood buffer and would progressively cleanse the water through the reed roots. With the reduction of excessive fertilizers, reed quality would improve towards the final beds. The poorer quality reed would be utilised for fuel chaff or building insulation as in the prototype structure I have designed.

     Acid-tolerant reed and coppice would be at the centre of the system. Other crops would be on the border in more neutral soil. Short term produce would be thatching reed and renewable fuel from willow (investment return possibly within two years). Further fuel coppice could take between 3 to 7 years. Food crops could be from 2 years onwards up to 400 years depending on the crop. Reed will grow from the same roots every year, willow up to 7 years before becoming tired, but very easily propogated.

     Fuel crops are low level, low return, but commercially stable, and will become more so as the green impact bites globally. Research and development will take the quality end of the crop and turn it into high spec., valuable standardised building sections, totally green and sustainable, for the construction of prefabricated homes both for Ireland and for export. This will increase the value of the crop considerably. Modern scientific monitoring of the first prototype house will be carried out, to ascertain its durability and eco value, its thermal insulation properties, and its commercial viability. A similar scientific approach will be taken towards the cleansing of the environment and the benefits of the system for wildlife.

     Presently a considerable importation occurs annually of thatching reed and straw. This scheme would not only reduce imports but could produce exports. Reed and coppice timber has far greater potential than just thatching, and this should be explored.
 
     Training in traditional skills and agricultural methods would be central to the scheme, as would be the marriage of these green skills and materials with 21st century technology and design.

     The use of wind or water power would be employed for basic processing of fuel or wood pellets wherever possible.

     A storage and distribution centre would be established.

     The central system of water flow and drainage, once set up, could allow for sideways expansion of the plan, land space permitting, without the need for much further expense in the infrastructure, and the model, once proven, could be replicated any number of times throughout the country, but especially on otherwise-unproductive areas such as exhausted Bord na Mona turf bogs and boggy Coillte land. From quite small to very large areas would work, especially with the central collection and distribution warehouses to handle the national crop. Small farmers with areas of poor land could benefit greatly. Those research crops from the bordering fields which showed the best potential would be further developed either adjacently or on separate sites. The potential for wealth and jobs creation is vast, as is the environmental and ecological benefit from the scheme. Initial start-up costs would be very modest, and growth would be controllable. Each module would be small compared with the national scheme of the future, and as such the whole scheme would not fail due to one factor, such as rising fossil fuel costs. Massive single businesses, while financially very successful, are also prone to sudden catastrophic collapse. This scheme would start all from the same point, that is the growing of cellulosic materials, but would have sufficient diverse outlets to protect the system as a whole. 
  The plan I have devised is to take a small area of poor quality, saturated acid land, up to 20 acres, bordered by strips of better, less acid land up to a further 20 acres, although the scheme could well be established on a much smaller area. On this would be created a pilot project for the growing of various green products. Typically the site  would be level, low-lying, and surrounded by open drainage ditches. The bottom of these drains would be full of stagnant water for much of the year, heavily polluted with nitrates, phosphates, pathogens like crypto spiridium and e-coli, and many other organic and chemical substances accumulated from the surrounding district. Heavy rain and flood conditions would periodically flush this poison into the larger watercourses and rivers.
     Within 3 years I would expect to start harvesting several commercial crops and up to 7 years would see the full development of several more. The total achievements from the site would be as follows:

Renewable fuel with negative carbon footprint.
Green construction materials.
Research and development of green buildings.
A science and technology centre.
A website for the sharing of knowledge, skills and ideas.
Tourism.
Skills and craft training and application.
Low energy farming and harvesting.
Natural energy processing and manufacturing.
Allotments and therapy gardens.
Visitor centre.
Wildlife centre.
Carbon-negative food production.
Waste treatment.
Purification of ground water and environment.
Centre for culture and heritage.

     The stagnant drains would be led into a small collection lake and from there would be circulated, ideally by wind pump, through a series of gravity-fed terraced reedbeds back to the lake.  This system would act as a flood buffer and would progressively cleanse the water through the reed roots. With the reduction of excessive fertilizers, reed quality would improve towards the final beds. The poorer quality reed would be utilised for fuel chaff or building insulation as in the prototype structure I have designed.

     Acid-tolerant reed and coppice would be at the centre of the system. Other crops would be on the border in more neutral soil. Short term produce would be thatching reed and renewable fuel from willow (investment return possibly within two years). Further fuel coppice could take between 3 to 7 years. Food crops could be from 2 years onwards up to 400 years depending on the crop. Reed will grow from the same roots every year, willow up to 7 years before becoming tired, but very easily propogated.

     Fuel crops are low level, low return, but commercially stable, and will become more so as the green impact bites globally. Research and development will take the quality end of the crop and turn it into high spec., valuable standardised building sections, totally green and sustainable, for the construction of prefabricated homes both for Ireland and for export. This will increase the value of the crop considerably. Modern scientific monitoring of the first prototype house will be carried out, to ascertain its durability and eco value, its thermal insulation properties, and its commercial viability. A similar scientific approach will be taken towards the cleansing of the environment and the benefits of the system for wildlife.

     Presently a considerable importation occurs annually of thatching reed and straw. This scheme would not only reduce imports but could produce exports. Reed and coppice timber has far greater potential than just thatching, and this should be explored.
 
     Training in traditional skills and agricultural methods would be central to the scheme, as would be the marriage of these green skills and materials with 21st century technology and design.

     The use of wind or water power would be employed for basic processing of fuel or wood pellets wherever possible.

     A storage and distribution centre would be established.

     The central system of water flow and drainage, once set up, could allow for sideways expansion of the plan, land space permitting, without the need for much further expense in the infrastructure, and the model, once proven, could be replicated any number of times throughout the country, but especially on otherwise-unproductive areas such as exhausted Bord na Mona turf bogs and boggy Coillte land. From quite small to very large areas would work, especially with the central collection and distribution warehouses to handle the national crop. Small farmers with areas of poor land could benefit greatly. Those research crops from the bordering fields which showed the best potential would be further developed either adjacently or on separate sites. The potential for wealth and jobs creation is vast, as is the environmental and ecological benefit from the scheme. Initial start-up costs would be very modest, and growth would be controllable. Each module would be small compared with the national scheme of the future, and as such the whole scheme would not fail due to one factor, such as rising fossil fuel costs. Massive single businesses, while financially very successful, are also prone to sudden catastrophic collapse. This scheme would start all from the same point, that is the growing of cellulosic materials, but would have sufficient diverse outlets to protect the system as a whole. 
  The plan I have devised is to take a small area of poor quality, saturated acid land, up to 20 acres, bordered by strips of better, less acid land up to a further 20 acres, although the scheme could well be established on a much smaller area. On this would be created a pilot project for the growing of various green products. Typically the site  would be level, low-lying, and surrounded by open drainage ditches. The bottom of these drains would be full of stagnant water for much of the year, heavily polluted with nitrates, phosphates, pathogens like crypto spiridium and e-coli, and many other organic and chemical substances accumulated from the surrounding district. Heavy rain and flood conditions would periodically flush this poison into the larger watercourses and rivers.
     Within 3 years I would expect to start harvesting several commercial crops and up to 7 years would see the full development of several more. The total achievements from the site would be as follows:

Renewable fuel with negative carbon footprint.
Green construction materials.
Research and development of green buildings.
A science and technology centre.
A website for the sharing of knowledge, skills and ideas.
Tourism.
Skills and craft training and application.
Low energy farming and harvesting.
Natural energy processing and manufacturing.
Allotments and therapy gardens.
Visitor centre.
Wildlife centre.
Carbon-negative food production.
Waste treatment.
Purification of ground water and environment.
Centre for culture and heritage.

     The stagnant drains would be led into a small collection lake and from there would be circulated, ideally by wind pump, through a series of gravity-fed terraced reedbeds back to the lake.  This system would act as a flood buffer and would progressively cleanse the water through the reed roots. With the reduction of excessive fertilizers, reed quality would improve towards the final beds. The poorer quality reed would be utilised for fuel chaff or building insulation as in the prototype structure I have designed.

     Acid-tolerant reed and coppice would be at the centre of the system. Other crops would be on the border in more neutral soil. Short term produce would be thatching reed and renewable fuel from willow (investment return possibly within two years). Further fuel coppice could take between 3 to 7 years. Food crops could be from 2 years onwards up to 400 years depending on the crop. Reed will grow from the same roots every year, willow up to 7 years before becoming tired, but very easily propogated.

     Fuel crops are low level, low return, but commercially stable, and will become more so as the green impact bites globally. Research and development will take the quality end of the crop and turn it into high spec., valuable standardised building sections, totally green and sustainable, for the construction of prefabricated homes both for Ireland and for export. This will increase the value of the crop considerably. Modern scientific monitoring of the first prototype house will be carried out, to ascertain its durability and eco value, its thermal insulation properties, and its commercial viability. A similar scientific approach will be taken towards the cleansing of the environment and the benefits of the system for wildlife.

     Presently a considerable importation occurs annually of thatching reed and straw. This scheme would not only reduce imports but could produce exports. Reed and coppice timber has far greater potential than just thatching, and this should be explored.
 
     Training in traditional skills and agricultural methods would be central to the scheme, as would be the marriage of these green skills and materials with 21st century technology and design.

     The use of wind or water power would be employed for basic processing of fuel or wood pellets wherever possible.

     A storage and distribution centre would be established.

     The central system of water flow and drainage, once set up, could allow for sideways expansion of the plan, land space permitting, without the need for much further expense in the infrastructure, and the model, once proven, could be replicated any number of times throughout the country, but especially on otherwise-unproductive areas such as exhausted Bord na Mona turf bogs and boggy Coillte land. From quite small to very large areas would work, especially with the central collection and distribution warehouses to handle the national crop. Small farmers with areas of poor land could benefit greatly. Those research crops from the bordering fields which showed the best potential would be further developed either adjacently or on separate sites. The potential for wealth and jobs creation is vast, as is the environmental and ecological benefit from the scheme. Initial start-up costs would be very modest, and growth would be controllable. Each module would be small compared with the national scheme of the future, and as such the whole scheme would not fail due to one factor, such as rising fossil fuel costs. Massive single businesses, while financially very successful, are also prone to sudden catastrophic collapse. This scheme would start all from the same point, that is the growing of cellulosic materials, but would have sufficient diverse outlets to protect the system as a whole. 
  The plan I have devised is to take a small area of poor quality, saturated acid land, up to 20 acres, bordered by strips of better, less acid land up to a further 20 acres, although the scheme could well be established on a much smaller area. On this would be created a pilot project for the growing of various green products. Typically the site  would be level, low-lying, and surrounded by open drainage ditches. The bottom of these drains would be full of stagnant water for much of the year, heavily polluted with nitrates, phosphates, pathogens like crypto spiridium and e-coli, and many other organic and chemical substances accumulated from the surrounding district. Heavy rain and flood conditions would periodically flush this poison into the larger watercourses and rivers.
     Within 3 years I would expect to start harvesting several commercial crops and up to 7 years would see the full development of several more. The total achievements from the site would be as follows:

Renewable fuel with negative carbon footprint.
Green construction materials.
Research and development of green buildings.
A science and technology centre.
A website for the sharing of knowledge, skills and ideas.
Tourism.
Skills and craft training and application.
Low energy farming and harvesting.
Natural energy processing and manufacturing.
Allotments and therapy gardens.
Visitor centre.
Wildlife centre.
Carbon-negative food production.
Waste treatment.
Purification of ground water and environment.
Centre for culture and heritage.

     The stagnant drains would be led into a small collection lake and from there would be circulated, ideally by wind pump, through a series of gravity-fed terraced reedbeds back to the lake.  This system would act as a flood buffer and would progressively cleanse the water through the reed roots. With the reduction of excessive fertilizers, reed quality would improve towards the final beds. The poorer quality reed would be utilised for fuel chaff or building insulation as in the prototype structure I have designed.

     Acid-tolerant reed and coppice would be at the centre of the system. Other crops would be on the border in more neutral soil. Short term produce would be thatching reed and renewable fuel from willow (investment return possibly within two years). Further fuel coppice could take between 3 to 7 years. Food crops could be from 2 years onwards up to 400 years depending on the crop. Reed will grow from the same roots every year, willow up to 7 years before becoming tired, but very easily propogated.

     Fuel crops are low level, low return, but commercially stable, and will become more so as the green impact bites globally. Research and development will take the quality end of the crop and turn it into high spec., valuable standardised building sections, totally green and sustainable, for the construction of prefabricated homes both for Ireland and for export. This will increase the value of the crop considerably. Modern scientific monitoring of the first prototype house will be carried out, to ascertain its durability and eco value, its thermal insulation properties, and its commercial viability. A similar scientific approach will be taken towards the cleansing of the environment and the benefits of the system for wildlife.

     Presently a considerable importation occurs annually of thatching reed and straw. This scheme would not only reduce imports but could produce exports. Reed and coppice timber has far greater potential than just thatching, and this should be explored.
 
     Training in traditional skills and agricultural methods would be central to the scheme, as would be the marriage of these green skills and materials with 21st century technology and design.

     The use of wind or water power would be employed for basic processing of fuel or wood pellets wherever possible.

     A storage and distribution centre would be established.

     The central system of water flow and drainage, once set up, could allow for sideways expansion of the plan, land space permitting, without the need for much further expense in the infrastructure, and the model, once proven, could be replicated any number of times throughout the country, but especially on otherwise-unproductive areas such as exhausted Bord na Mona turf bogs and boggy Coillte land. From quite small to very large areas would work, especially with the central collection and distribution warehouses to handle the national crop. Small farmers with areas of poor land could benefit greatly. Those research crops from the bordering fields which showed the best potential would be further developed either adjacently or on separate sites. The potential for wealth and jobs creation is vast, as is the environmental and ecological benefit from the scheme. Initial start-up costs would be very modest, and growth would be controllable. Each module would be small compared with the national scheme of the future, and as such the whole scheme would not fail due to one factor, such as rising fossil fuel costs. Massive single businesses, while financially very successful, are also prone to sudden catastrophic collapse. This scheme would start all from the same point, that is the growing of cellulosic materials, but would have sufficient diverse outlets to protect the system as a whole. 
  The plan I have devised is to take a small area of poor quality, saturated acid land, up to 20 acres, bordered by strips of better, less acid land up to a further 20 acres, although the scheme could well be established on a much smaller area. On this would be created a pilot project for the growing of various green products. Typically the site  would be level, low-lying, and surrounded by open drainage ditches. The bottom of these drains would be full of stagnant water for much of the year, heavily polluted with nitrates, phosphates, pathogens like crypto spiridium and e-coli, and many other organic and chemical substances accumulated from the surrounding district. Heavy rain and flood conditions would periodically flush this poison into the larger watercourses and rivers.
     Within 3 years I would expect to start harvesting several commercial crops and up to 7 years would see the full development of several more. The total achievements from the site would be as follows:

Renewable fuel with negative carbon footprint.
Green construction materials.
Research and development of green buildings.
A science and technology centre.
A website for the sharing of knowledge, skills and ideas.
Tourism.
Skills and craft training and application.
Low energy farming and harvesting.
Natural energy processing and manufacturing.
Allotments and therapy gardens.
Visitor centre.
Wildlife centre.
Carbon-negative food production.
Waste treatment.
Purification of ground water and environment.
Centre for culture and heritage.

     The stagnant drains would be led into a small collection lake and from there would be circulated, ideally by wind pump, through a series of gravity-fed terraced reedbeds back to the lake.  This system would act as a flood buffer and would progressively cleanse the water through the reed roots. With the reduction of excessive fertilizers, reed quality would improve towards the final beds. The poorer quality reed would be utilised for fuel chaff or building insulation as in the prototype structure I have designed.

     Acid-tolerant reed and coppice would be at the centre of the system. Other crops would be on the border in more neutral soil. Short term produce would be thatching reed and renewable fuel from willow (investment return possibly within two years). Further fuel coppice could take between 3 to 7 years. Food crops could be from 2 years onwards up to 400 years depending on the crop. Reed will grow from the same roots every year, willow up to 7 years before becoming tired, but very easily propogated.

     Fuel crops are low level, low return, but commercially stable, and will become more so as the green impact bites globally. Research and development will take the quality end of the crop and turn it into high spec., valuable standardised building sections, totally green and sustainable, for the construction of prefabricated homes both for Ireland and for export. This will increase the value of the crop considerably. Modern scientific monitoring of the first prototype house will be carried out, to ascertain its durability and eco value, its thermal insulation properties, and its commercial viability. A similar scientific approach will be taken towards the cleansing of the environment and the benefits of the system for wildlife.

     Presently a considerable importation occurs annually of thatching reed and straw. This scheme would not only reduce imports but could produce exports. Reed and coppice timber has far greater potential than just thatching, and this should be explored.
 
     Training in traditional skills and agricultural methods would be central to the scheme, as would be the marriage of these green skills and materials with 21st century technology and design.

     The use of wind or water power would be employed for basic processing of fuel or wood pellets wherever possible.

     A storage and distribution centre would be established.

     The central system of water flow and drainage, once set up, could allow for sideways expansion of the plan, land space permitting, without the need for much further expense in the infrastructure, and the model, once proven, could be replicated any number of times throughout the country, but especially on otherwise-unproductive areas such as exhausted Bord na Mona turf bogs and boggy Coillte land. From quite small to very large areas would work, especially with the central collection and distribution warehouses to handle the national crop. Small farmers with areas of poor land could benefit greatly. Those research crops from the bordering fields which showed the best potential would be further developed either adjacently or on separate sites. The potential for wealth and jobs creation is vast, as is the environmental and ecological benefit from the scheme. Initial start-up costs would be very modest, and growth would be controllable. Each module would be small compared with the national scheme of the future, and as such the whole scheme would not fail due to one factor, such as rising fossil fuel costs. Massive single businesses, while financially very successful, are also prone to sudden catastrophic collapse. This scheme would start all from the same point, that is the growing of cellulosic materials, but would have sufficient diverse outlets to protect the system as a whole. 
  The plan I have devised is to take a small area of poor quality, saturated acid land, up to 20 acres, bordered by strips of better, less acid land up to a further 20 acres, although the scheme could well be established on a much smaller area. On this would be created a pilot project for the growing of various green products. Typically the site  would be level, low-lying, and surrounded by open drainage ditches. The bottom of these drains would be full of stagnant water for much of the year, heavily polluted with nitrates, phosphates, pathogens like crypto spiridium and e-coli, and many other organic and chemical substances accumulated from the surrounding district. Heavy rain and flood conditions would periodically flush this poison into the larger watercourses and rivers.
     Within 3 years I would expect to start harvesting several commercial crops and up to 7 years would see the full development of several more. The total achievements from the site would be as follows:

Renewable fuel with negative carbon footprint.
Green construction materials.
Research and development of green buildings.
A science and technology centre.
A website for the sharing of knowledge, skills and ideas.
Tourism.
Skills and craft training and application.
Low energy farming and harvesting.
Natural energy processing and manufacturing.
Allotments and therapy gardens.
Visitor centre.
Wildlife centre.
Carbon-negative food production.
Waste treatment.
Purification of ground water and environment.
Centre for culture and heritage.

     The stagnant drains would be led into a small collection lake and from there would be circulated, ideally by wind pump, through a series of gravity-fed terraced reedbeds back to the lake.  This system would act as a flood buffer and would progressively cleanse the water through the reed roots. With the reduction of excessive fertilizers, reed quality would improve towards the final beds. The poorer quality reed would be utilised for fuel chaff or building insulation as in the prototype structure I have designed.

     Acid-tolerant reed and coppice would be at the centre of the system. Other crops would be on the border in more neutral soil. Short term produce would be thatching reed and renewable fuel from willow (investment return possibly within two years). Further fuel coppice could take between 3 to 7 years. Food crops could be from 2 years onwards up to 400 years depending on the crop. Reed will grow from the same roots every year, willow up to 7 years before becoming tired, but very easily propogated.

     Fuel crops are low level, low return, but commercially stable, and will become more so as the green impact bites globally. Research and development will take the quality end of the crop and turn it into high spec., valuable standardised building sections, totally green and sustainable, for the construction of prefabricated homes both for Ireland and for export. This will increase the value of the crop considerably. Modern scientific monitoring of the first prototype house will be carried out, to ascertain its durability and eco value, its thermal insulation properties, and its commercial viability. A similar scientific approach will be taken towards the cleansing of the environment and the benefits of the system for wildlife.

     Presently a considerable importation occurs annually of thatching reed and straw. This scheme would not only reduce imports but could produce exports. Reed and coppice timber has far greater potential than just thatching, and this should be explored.
 
     Training in traditional skills and agricultural methods would be central to the scheme, as would be the marriage of these green skills and materials with 21st century technology and design.

     The use of wind or water power would be employed for basic processing of fuel or wood pellets wherever possible.

     A storage and distribution centre would be established.

     The central system of water flow and drainage, once set up, could allow for sideways expansion of the plan, land space permitting, without the need for much further expense in the infrastructure, and the model, once proven, could be replicated any number of times throughout the country, but especially on otherwise-unproductive areas such as exhausted Bord na Mona turf bogs and boggy Coillte land. From quite small to very large areas would work, especially with the central collection and distribution warehouses to handle the national crop. Small farmers with areas of poor land could benefit greatly. Those research crops from the bordering fields which showed the best potential would be further developed either adjacently or on separate sites. The potential for wealth and jobs creation is vast, as is the environmental and ecological benefit from the scheme. Initial start-up costs would be very modest, and growth would be controllable. Each module would be small compared with the national scheme of the future, and as such the whole scheme would not fail due to one factor, such as rising fossil fuel costs. Massive single businesses, while financially very successful, are also prone to sudden catastrophic collapse. This scheme would start all from the same point, that is the growing of cellulosic materials, but would have sufficient diverse outlets to protect the system as a whole. 
  The plan I have devised is to take a small area of poor quality, saturated acid land, up to 20 acres, bordered by strips of better, less acid land up to a further 20 acres, although the scheme could well be established on a much smaller area. On this would be created a pilot project for the growing of various green products. Typically the site  would be level, low-lying, and surrounded by open drainage ditches. The bottom of these drains would be full of stagnant water for much of the year, heavily polluted with nitrates, phosphates, pathogens like crypto spiridium and e-coli, and many other organic and chemical substances accumulated from the surrounding district. Heavy rain and flood conditions would periodically flush this poison into the larger watercourses and rivers.
     Within 3 years I would expect to start harvesting several commercial crops and up to 7 years would see the full development of several more. The total achievements from the site would be as follows:

Renewable fuel with negative carbon footprint.
Green construction materials.
Research and development of green buildings.
A science and technology centre.
A website for the sharing of knowledge, skills and ideas.
Tourism.
Skills and craft training and application.
Low energy farming and harvesting.
Natural energy processing and manufacturing.
Allotments and therapy gardens.
Visitor centre.
Wildlife centre.
Carbon-negative food production.
Waste treatment.
Purification of ground water and environment.
Centre for culture and heritage.

     The stagnant drains would be led into a small collection lake and from there would be circulated, ideally by wind pump, through a series of gravity-fed terraced reedbeds back to the lake.  This system would act as a flood buffer and would progressively cleanse the water through the reed roots. With the reduction of excessive fertilizers, reed quality would improve towards the final beds. The poorer quality reed would be utilised for fuel chaff or building insulation as in the prototype structure I have designed.

     Acid-tolerant reed and coppice would be at the centre of the system. Other crops would be on the border in more neutral soil. Short term produce would be thatching reed and renewable fuel from willow (investment return possibly within two years). Further fuel coppice could take between 3 to 7 years. Food crops could be from 2 years onwards up to 400 years depending on the crop. Reed will grow from the same roots every year, willow up to 7 years before becoming tired, but very easily propogated.

     Fuel crops are low level, low return, but commercially stable, and will become more so as the green impact bites globally. Research and development will take the quality end of the crop and turn it into high spec., valuable standardised building sections, totally green and sustainable, for the construction of prefabricated homes both for Ireland and for export. This will increase the value of the crop considerably. Modern scientific monitoring of the first prototype house will be carried out, to ascertain its durability and eco value, its thermal insulation properties, and its commercial viability. A similar scientific approach will be taken towards the cleansing of the environment and the benefits of the system for wildlife.

     Presently a considerable importation occurs annually of thatching reed and straw. This scheme would not only reduce imports but could produce exports. Reed and coppice timber has far greater potential than just thatching, and this should be explored.
 
     Training in traditional skills and agricultural methods would be central to the scheme, as would be the marriage of these green skills and materials with 21st century technology and design.

     The use of wind or water power would be employed for basic processing of fuel or wood pellets wherever possible.

     A storage and distribution centre would be established.

     The central system of water flow and drainage, once set up, could allow for sideways expansion of the plan, land space permitting, without the need for much further expense in the infrastructure, and the model, once proven, could be replicated any number of times throughout the country, but especially on otherwise-unproductive areas such as exhausted Bord na Mona turf bogs and boggy Coillte land. From quite small to very large areas would work, especially with the central collection and distribution warehouses to handle the national crop. Small farmers with areas of poor land could benefit greatly. Those research crops from the bordering fields which showed the best potential would be further developed either adjacently or on separate sites. The potential for wealth and jobs creation is vast, as is the environmental and ecological benefit from the scheme. Initial start-up costs would be very modest, and growth would be controllable. Each module would be small compared with the national scheme of the future, and as such the whole scheme would not fail due to one factor, such as rising fossil fuel costs. Massive single businesses, while financially very successful, are also prone to sudden catastrophic collapse. This scheme would start all from the same point, that is the growing of cellulosic materials, but would have sufficient diverse outlets to protect the system as a whole. 
  The plan I have devised is to take a small area of poor quality, saturated acid land, up to 20 acres, bordered by strips of better, less acid land up to a further 20 acres, although the scheme could well be established on a much smaller area. On this would be created a pilot project for the growing of various green products. Typically the site  would be level, low-lying, and surrounded by open drainage ditches. The bottom of these drains would be full of stagnant water for much of the year, heavily polluted with nitrates, phosphates, pathogens like crypto spiridium and e-coli, and many other organic and chemical substances accumulated from the surrounding district. Heavy rain and flood conditions would periodically flush this poison into the larger watercourses and rivers.
     Within 3 years I would expect to start harvesting several commercial crops and up to 7 years would see the full development of several more. The total achievements from the site would be as follows:

Renewable fuel with negative carbon footprint.
Green construction materials.
Research and development of green buildings.
A science and technology centre.
A website for the sharing of knowledge, skills and ideas.
Tourism.
Skills and craft training and application.
Low energy farming and harvesting.
Natural energy processing and manufacturing.
Allotments and therapy gardens.
Visitor centre.
Wildlife centre.
Carbon-negative food production.
Waste treatment.
Purification of ground water and environment.
Centre for culture and heritage.

     The stagnant drains would be led into a small collection lake and from there would be circulated, ideally by wind pump, through a series of gravity-fed terraced reedbeds back to the lake.  This system would act as a flood buffer and would progressively cleanse the water through the reed roots. With the reduction of excessive fertilizers, reed quality would improve towards the final beds. The poorer quality reed would be utilised for fuel chaff or building insulation as in the prototype structure I have designed.

     Acid-tolerant reed and coppice would be at the centre of the system. Other crops would be on the border in more neutral soil. Short term produce would be thatching reed and renewable fuel from willow (investment return possibly within two years). Further fuel coppice could take between 3 to 7 years. Food crops could be from 2 years onwards up to 400 years depending on the crop. Reed will grow from the same roots every year, willow up to 7 years before becoming tired, but very easily propogated.

     Fuel crops are low level, low return, but commercially stable, and will become more so as the green impact bites globally. Research and development will take the quality end of the crop and turn it into high spec., valuable standardised building sections, totally green and sustainable, for the construction of prefabricated homes both for Ireland and for export. This will increase the value of the crop considerably. Modern scientific monitoring of the first prototype house will be carried out, to ascertain its durability and eco value, its thermal insulation properties, and its commercial viability. A similar scientific approach will be taken towards the cleansing of the environment and the benefits of the system for wildlife.

     Presently a considerable importation occurs annually of thatching reed and straw. This scheme would not only reduce imports but could produce exports. Reed and coppice timber has far greater potential than just thatching, and this should be explored.
 
     Training in traditional skills and agricultural methods would be central to the scheme, as would be the marriage of these green skills and materials with 21st century technology and design.

     The use of wind or water power would be employed for basic processing of fuel or wood pellets wherever possible.

     A storage and distribution centre would be established.

     The central system of water flow and drainage, once set up, could allow for sideways expansion of the plan, land space permitting, without the need for much further expense in the infrastructure, and the model, once proven, could be replicated any number of times throughout the country, but especially on otherwise-unproductive areas such as exhausted Bord na Mona turf bogs and boggy Coillte land. From quite small to very large areas would work, especially with the central collection and distribution warehouses to handle the national crop. Small farmers with areas of poor land could benefit greatly. Those research crops from the bordering fields which showed the best potential would be further developed either adjacently or on separate sites. The potential for wealth and jobs creation is vast, as is the environmental and ecological benefit from the scheme. Initial start-up costs would be very modest, and growth would be controllable. Each module would be small compared with the national scheme of the future, and as such the whole scheme would not fail due to one factor, such as rising fossil fuel costs. Massive single businesses, while financially very successful, are also prone to sudden catastrophic collapse. This scheme would start all from the same point, that is the growing of cellulosic materials, but would have sufficient diverse outlets to protect the system as a whole. 
  The plan I have devised is to take a small area of poor quality, saturated acid land, up to 20 acres, bordered by strips of better, less acid land up to a further 20 acres, although the scheme could well be established on a much smaller area. On this would be created a pilot project for the growing of various green products. Typically the site  would be level, low-lying, and surrounded by open drainage ditches. The bottom of these drains would be full of stagnant water for much of the year, heavily polluted with nitrates, phosphates, pathogens like crypto spiridium and e-coli, and many other organic and chemical substances accumulated from the surrounding district. Heavy rain and flood conditions would periodically flush this poison into the larger watercourses and rivers.
     Within 3 years I would expect to start harvesting several commercial crops and up to 7 years would see the full development of several more. The total achievements from the site would be as follows:

Renewable fuel with negative carbon footprint.
Green construction materials.
Research and development of green buildings.
A science and technology centre.
A website for the sharing of knowledge, skills and ideas.
Tourism.
Skills and craft training and application.
Low energy farming and harvesting.
Natural energy processing and manufacturing.
Allotments and therapy gardens.
Visitor centre.
Wildlife centre.
Carbon-negative food production.
Waste treatment.
Purification of ground water and environment.
Centre for culture and heritage.

     The stagnant drains would be led into a small collection lake and from there would be circulated, ideally by wind pump, through a series of gravity-fed terraced reedbeds back to the lake.  This system would act as a flood buffer and would progressively cleanse the water through the reed roots. With the reduction of excessive fertilizers, reed quality would improve towards the final beds. The poorer quality reed would be utilised for fuel chaff or building insulation as in the prototype structure I have designed.

     Acid-tolerant reed and coppice would be at the centre of the system. Other crops would be on the border in more neutral soil. Short term produce would be thatching reed and renewable fuel from willow (investment return possibly within two years). Further fuel coppice could take between 3 to 7 years. Food crops could be from 2 years onwards up to 400 years depending on the crop. Reed will grow from the same roots every year, willow up to 7 years before becoming tired, but very easily propogated.

     Fuel crops are low level, low return, but commercially stable, and will become more so as the green impact bites globally. Research and development will take the quality end of the crop and turn it into high spec., valuable standardised building sections, totally green and sustainable, for the construction of prefabricated homes both for Ireland and for export. This will increase the value of the crop considerably. Modern scientific monitoring of the first prototype house will be carried out, to ascertain its durability and eco value, its thermal insulation properties, and its commercial viability. A similar scientific approach will be taken towards the cleansing of the environment and the benefits of the system for wildlife.

     Presently a considerable importation occurs annually of thatching reed and straw. This scheme would not only reduce imports but could produce exports. Reed and coppice timber has far greater potential than just thatching, and this should be explored.
 
     Training in traditional skills and agricultural methods would be central to the scheme, as would be the marriage of these green skills and materials with 21st century technology and design.

     The use of wind or water power would be employed for basic processing of fuel or wood pellets wherever possible.

     A storage and distribution centre would be established.

     The central system of water flow and drainage, once set up, could allow for sideways expansion of the plan, land space permitting, without the need for much further expense in the infrastructure, and the model, once proven, could be replicated any number of times throughout the country, but especially on otherwise-unproductive areas such as exhausted Bord na Mona turf bogs and boggy Coillte land. From quite small to very large areas would work, especially with the central collection and distribution warehouses to handle the national crop. Small farmers with areas of poor land could benefit greatly. Those research crops from the bordering fields which showed the best potential would be further developed either adjacently or on separate sites. The potential for wealth and jobs creation is vast, as is the environmental and ecological benefit from the scheme. Initial start-up costs would be very modest, and growth would be controllable. Each module would be small compared with the national scheme of the future, and as such the whole scheme would not fail due to one factor, such as rising fossil fuel costs. Massive single businesses, while financially very successful, are also prone to sudden catastrophic collapse. This scheme would start all from the same point, that is the growing of cellulosic materials, but would have sufficient diverse outlets to protect the system as a whole. 
  The plan I have devised is to take a small area of poor quality, saturated acid land, up to 20 acres, bordered by strips of better, less acid land up to a further 20 acres, although the scheme could well be established on a much smaller area. On this would be created a pilot project for the growing of various green products. Typically the site  would be level, low-lying, and surrounded by open drainage ditches. The bottom of these drains would be full of stagnant water for much of the year, heavily polluted with nitrates, phosphates, pathogens like crypto spiridium and e-coli, and many other organic and chemical substances accumulated from the surrounding district. Heavy rain and flood conditions would periodically flush this poison into the larger watercourses and rivers.
     Within 3 years I would expect to start harvesting several commercial crops and up to 7 years would see the full development of several more. The total achievements from the site would be as follows:

Renewable fuel with negative carbon footprint.
Green construction materials.
Research and development of green buildings.
A science and technology centre.
A website for the sharing of knowledge, skills and ideas.
Tourism.
Skills and craft training and application.
Low energy farming and harvesting.
Natural energy processing and manufacturing.
Allotments and therapy gardens.
Visitor centre.
Wildlife centre.
Carbon-negative food production.
Waste treatment.
Purification of ground water and environment.
Centre for culture and heritage.

     The stagnant drains would be led into a small collection lake and from there would be circulated, ideally by wind pump, through a series of gravity-fed terraced reedbeds back to the lake.  This system would act as a flood buffer and would progressively cleanse the water through the reed roots. With the reduction of excessive fertilizers, reed quality would improve towards the final beds. The poorer quality reed would be utilised for fuel chaff or building insulation as in the prototype structure I have designed.

     Acid-tolerant reed and coppice would be at the centre of the system. Other crops would be on the border in more neutral soil. Short term produce would be thatching reed and renewable fuel from willow (investment return possibly within two years). Further fuel coppice could take between 3 to 7 years. Food crops could be from 2 years onwards up to 400 years depending on the crop. Reed will grow from the same roots every year, willow up to 7 years before becoming tired, but very easily propogated.

     Fuel crops are low level, low return, but commercially stable, and will become more so as the green impact bites globally. Research and development will take the quality end of the crop and turn it into high spec., valuable standardised building sections, totally green and sustainable, for the construction of prefabricated homes both for Ireland and for export. This will increase the value of the crop considerably. Modern scientific monitoring of the first prototype house will be carried out, to ascertain its durability and eco value, its thermal insulation properties, and its commercial viability. A similar scientific approach will be taken towards the cleansing of the environment and the benefits of the system for wildlife.

     Presently a considerable importation occurs annually of thatching reed and straw. This scheme would not only reduce imports but could produce exports. Reed and coppice timber has far greater potential than just thatching, and this should be explored.
 
     Training in traditional skills and agricultural methods would be central to the scheme, as would be the marriage of these green skills and materials with 21st century technology and design.

     The use of wind or water power would be employed for basic processing of fuel or wood pellets wherever possible.

     A storage and distribution centre would be established.

     The central system of water flow and drainage, once set up, could allow for sideways expansion of the plan, land space permitting, without the need for much further expense in the infrastructure, and the model, once proven, could be replicated any number of times throughout the country, but especially on otherwise-unproductive areas such as exhausted Bord na Mona turf bogs and boggy Coillte land. From quite small to very large areas would work, especially with the central collection and distribution warehouses to handle the national crop. Small farmers with areas of poor land could benefit greatly. Those research crops from the bordering fields which showed the best potential would be further developed either adjacently or on separate sites. The potential for wealth and jobs creation is vast, as is the environmental and ecological benefit from the scheme. Initial start-up costs would be very modest, and growth would be controllable. Each module would be small compared with the national scheme of the future, and as such the whole scheme would not fail due to one factor, such as rising fossil fuel costs. Massive single businesses, while financially very successful, are also prone to sudden catastrophic collapse. This scheme would start all from the same point, that is the growing of cellulosic materials, but would have sufficient diverse outlets to protect the system as a whole. 
  The plan I have devised is to take a small area of poor quality, saturated acid land, up to 20 acres, bordered by strips of better, less acid land up to a further 20 acres, although the scheme could well be established on a much smaller area. On this would be created a pilot project for the growing of various green products. Typically the site  would be level, low-lying, and surrounded by open drainage ditches. The bottom of these drains would be full of stagnant water for much of the year, heavily polluted with nitrates, phosphates, pathogens like crypto spiridium and e-coli, and many other organic and chemical substances accumulated from the surrounding district. Heavy rain and flood conditions would periodically flush this poison into the larger watercourses and rivers.
     Within 3 years I would expect to start harvesting several commercial crops and up to 7 years would see the full development of several more. The total achievements from the site would be as follows:

Renewable fuel with negative carbon footprint.
Green construction materials.
Research and development of green buildings.
A science and technology centre.
A website for the sharing of knowledge, skills and ideas.
Tourism.
Skills and craft training and application.
Low energy farming and harvesting.
Natural energy processing and manufacturing.
Allotments and therapy gardens.
Visitor centre.
Wildlife centre.
Carbon-negative food production.
Waste treatment.
Purification of ground water and environment.
Centre for culture and heritage.

     The stagnant drains would be led into a small collection lake and from there would be circulated, ideally by wind pump, through a series of gravity-fed terraced reedbeds back to the lake.  This system would act as a flood buffer and would progressively cleanse the water through the reed roots. With the reduction of excessive fertilizers, reed quality would improve towards the final beds. The poorer quality reed would be utilised for fuel chaff or building insulation as in the prototype structure I have designed.

     Acid-tolerant reed and coppice would be at the centre of the system. Other crops would be on the border in more neutral soil. Short term produce would be thatching reed and renewable fuel from willow (investment return possibly within two years). Further fuel coppice could take between 3 to 7 years. Food crops could be from 2 years onwards up to 400 years depending on the crop. Reed will grow from the same roots every year, willow up to 7 years before becoming tired, but very easily propogated.

     Fuel crops are low level, low return, but commercially stable, and will become more so as the green impact bites globally. Research and development will take the quality end of the crop and turn it into high spec., valuable standardised building sections, totally green and sustainable, for the construction of prefabricated homes both for Ireland and for export. This will increase the value of the crop considerably. Modern scientific monitoring of the first prototype house will be carried out, to ascertain its durability and eco value, its thermal insulation properties, and its commercial viability. A similar scientific approach will be taken towards the cleansing of the environment and the benefits of the system for wildlife.

     Presently a considerable importation occurs annually of thatching reed and straw. This scheme would not only reduce imports but could produce exports. Reed and coppice timber has far greater potential than just thatching, and this should be explored.
 
     Training in traditional skills and agricultural methods would be central to the scheme, as would be the marriage of these green skills and materials with 21st century technology and design.

     The use of wind or water power would be employed for basic processing of fuel or wood pellets wherever possible.

     A storage and distribution centre would be established.

     The central system of water flow and drainage, once set up, could allow for sideways expansion of the plan, land space permitting, without the need for much further expense in the infrastructure, and the model, once proven, could be replicated any number of times throughout the country, but especially on otherwise-unproductive areas such as exhausted Bord na Mona turf bogs and boggy Coillte land. From quite small to very large areas would work, especially with the central collection and distribution warehouses to handle the national crop. Small farmers with areas of poor land could benefit greatly. Those research crops from the bordering fields which showed the best potential would be further developed either adjacently or on separate sites. The potential for wealth and jobs creation is vast, as is the environmental and ecological benefit from the scheme. Initial start-up costs would be very modest, and growth would be controllable. Each module would be small compared with the national scheme of the future, and as such the whole scheme would not fail due to one factor, such as rising fossil fuel costs. Massive single businesses, while financially very successful, are also prone to sudden catastrophic collapse. This scheme would start all from the same point, that is the growing of cellulosic materials, but would have sufficient diverse outlets to protect the system as a whole. 
  The plan I have devised is to take a small area of poor quality, saturated acid land, up to 20 acres, bordered by strips of better, less acid land up to a further 20 acres, although the scheme could well be established on a much smaller area. On this would be created a pilot project for the growing of various green products. Typically the site  would be level, low-lying, and surrounded by open drainage ditches. The bottom of these drains would be full of stagnant water for much of the year, heavily polluted with nitrates, phosphates, pathogens like crypto spiridium and e-coli, and many other organic and chemical substances accumulated from the surrounding district. Heavy rain and flood conditions would periodically flush this poison into the larger watercourses and rivers.
     Within 3 years I would expect to start harvesting several commercial crops and up to 7 years would see the full development of several more. The total achievements from the site would be as follows:

Renewable fuel with negative carbon footprint.
Green construction materials.
Research and development of green buildings.
A science and technology centre.
A website for the sharing of knowledge, skills and ideas.
Tourism.
Skills and craft training and application.
Low energy farming and harvesting.
Natural energy processing and manufacturing.
Allotments and therapy gardens.
Visitor centre.
Wildlife centre.
Carbon-negative food production.
Waste treatment.
Purification of ground water and environment.
Centre for culture and heritage.

     The stagnant drains would be led into a small collection lake and from there would be circulated, ideally by wind pump, through a series of gravity-fed terraced reedbeds back to the lake.  This system would act as a flood buffer and would progressively cleanse the water through the reed roots. With the reduction of excessive fertilizers, reed quality would improve towards the final beds. The poorer quality reed would be utilised for fuel chaff or building insulation as in the prototype structure I have designed.

     Acid-tolerant reed and coppice would be at the centre of the system. Other crops would be on the border in more neutral soil. Short term produce would be thatching reed and renewable fuel from willow (investment return possibly within two years). Further fuel coppice could take between 3 to 7 years. Food crops could be from 2 years onwards up to 400 years depending on the crop. Reed will grow from the same roots every year, willow up to 7 years before becoming tired, but very easily propogated.

     Fuel crops are low level, low return, but commercially stable, and will become more so as the green impact bites globally. Research and development will take the quality end of the crop and turn it into high spec., valuable standardised building sections, totally green and sustainable, for the construction of prefabricated homes both for Ireland and for export. This will increase the value of the crop considerably. Modern scientific monitoring of the first prototype house will be carried out, to ascertain its durability and eco value, its thermal insulation properties, and its commercial viability. A similar scientific approach will be taken towards the cleansing of the environment and the benefits of the system for wildlife.

     Presently a considerable importation occurs annually of thatching reed and straw. This scheme would not only reduce imports but could produce exports. Reed and coppice timber has far greater potential than just thatching, and this should be explored.
 
     Training in traditional skills and agricultural methods would be central to the scheme, as would be the marriage of these green skills and materials with 21st century technology and design.

     The use of wind or water power would be employed for basic processing of fuel or wood pellets wherever possible.

     A storage and distribution centre would be established.

     The central system of water flow and drainage, once set up, could allow for sideways expansion of the plan, land space permitting, without the need for much further expense in the infrastructure, and the model, once proven, could be replicated any number of times throughout the country, but especially on otherwise-unproductive areas such as exhausted Bord na Mona turf bogs and boggy Coillte land. From quite small to very large areas would work, especially with the central collection and distribution warehouses to handle the national crop. Small farmers with areas of poor land could benefit greatly. Those research crops from the bordering fields which showed the best potential would be further developed either adjacently or on separate sites. The potential for wealth and jobs creation is vast, as is the environmental and ecological benefit from the scheme. Initial start-up costs would be very modest, and growth would be controllable. Each module would be small compared with the national scheme of the future, and as such the whole scheme would not fail due to one factor, such as rising fossil fuel costs. Massive single businesses, while financially very successful, are also prone to sudden catastrophic collapse. This scheme would start all from the same point, that is the growing of cellulosic materials, but would have sufficient diverse outlets to protect the system as a whole. 
  The plan I have devised is to take a small area of poor quality, saturated acid land, up to 20 acres, bordered by strips of better, less acid land up to a further 20 acres, although the scheme could well be established on a much smaller area. On this would be created a pilot project for the growing of various green products. Typically the site  would be level, low-lying, and surrounded by open drainage ditches. The bottom of these drains would be full of stagnant water for much of the year, heavily polluted with nitrates, phosphates, pathogens like crypto spiridium and e-coli, and many other organic and chemical substances accumulated from the surrounding district. Heavy rain and flood conditions would periodically flush this poison into the larger watercourses and rivers.
     Within 3 years I would expect to start harvesting several commercial crops and up to 7 years would see the full development of several more. The total achievements from the site would be as follows:

Renewable fuel with negative carbon footprint.
Green construction materials.
Research and development of green buildings.
A science and technology centre.
A website for the sharing of knowledge, skills and ideas.
Tourism.
Skills and craft training and application.
Low energy farming and harvesting.
Natural energy processing and manufacturing.
Allotments and therapy gardens.
Visitor centre.
Wildlife centre.
Carbon-negative food production.
Waste treatment.
Purification of ground water and environment.
Centre for culture and heritage.

     The stagnant drains would be led into a small collection lake and from there would be circulated, ideally by wind pump, through a series of gravity-fed terraced reedbeds back to the lake.  This system would act as a flood buffer and would progressively cleanse the water through the reed roots. With the reduction of excessive fertilizers, reed quality would improve towards the final beds. The poorer quality reed would be utilised for fuel chaff or building insulation as in the prototype structure I have designed.

     Acid-tolerant reed and coppice would be at the centre of the system. Other crops would be on the border in more neutral soil. Short term produce would be thatching reed and renewable fuel from willow (investment return possibly within two years). Further fuel coppice could take between 3 to 7 years. Food crops could be from 2 years onwards up to 400 years depending on the crop. Reed will grow from the same roots every year, willow up to 7 years before becoming tired, but very easily propogated.

     Fuel crops are low level, low return, but commercially stable, and will become more so as the green impact bites globally. Research and development will take the quality end of the crop and turn it into high spec., valuable standardised building sections, totally green and sustainable, for the construction of prefabricated homes both for Ireland and for export. This will increase the value of the crop considerably. Modern scientific monitoring of the first prototype house will be carried out, to ascertain its durability and eco value, its thermal insulation properties, and its commercial viability. A similar scientific approach will be taken towards the cleansing of the environment and the benefits of the system for wildlife.

     Presently a considerable importation occurs annually of thatching reed and straw. This scheme would not only reduce imports but could produce exports. Reed and coppice timber has far greater potential than just thatching, and this should be explored.
 
     Training in traditional skills and agricultural methods would be central to the scheme, as would be the marriage of these green skills and materials with 21st century technology and design.

     The use of wind or water power would be employed for basic processing of fuel or wood pellets wherever possible.

     A storage and distribution centre would be established.

     The central system of water flow and drainage, once set up, could allow for sideways expansion of the plan, land space permitting, without the need for much further expense in the infrastructure, and the model, once proven, could be replicated any number of times throughout the country, but especially on otherwise-unproductive areas such as exhausted Bord na Mona turf bogs and boggy Coillte land. From quite small to very large areas would work, especially with the central collection and distribution warehouses to handle the national crop. Small farmers with areas of poor land could benefit greatly. Those research crops from the bordering fields which showed the best potential would be further developed either adjacently or on separate sites. The potential for wealth and jobs creation is vast, as is the environmental and ecological benefit from the scheme. Initial start-up costs would be very modest, and growth would be controllable. Each module would be small compared with the national scheme of the future, and as such the whole scheme would not fail due to one factor, such as rising fossil fuel costs. Massive single businesses, while financially very successful, are also prone to sudden catastrophic collapse. This scheme would start all from the same point, that is the growing of cellulosic materials, but would have sufficient diverse outlets to protect the system as a whole. 
  The plan I have devised is to take a small area of poor quality, saturated acid land, up to 20 acres, bordered by strips of better, less acid land up to a further 20 acres, although the scheme could well be established on a much smaller area. On this would be created a pilot project for the growing of various green products. Typically the site  would be level, low-lying, and surrounded by open drainage ditches. The bottom of these drains would be full of stagnant water for much of the year, heavily polluted with nitrates, phosphates, pathogens like crypto spiridium and e-coli, and many other organic and chemical substances accumulated from the surrounding district. Heavy rain and flood conditions would periodically flush this poison into the larger watercourses and rivers.
     Within 3 years I would expect to start harvesting several commercial crops and up to 7 years would see the full development of several more. The total achievements from the site would be as follows:

Renewable fuel with negative carbon footprint.
Green construction materials.
Research and development of green buildings.
A science and technology centre.
A website for the sharing of knowledge, skills and ideas.
Tourism.
Skills and craft training and application.
Low energy farming and harvesting.
Natural energy processing and manufacturing.
Allotments and therapy gardens.
Visitor centre.
Wildlife centre.
Carbon-negative food production.
Waste treatment.
Purification of ground water and environment.
Centre for culture and heritage.

     The stagnant drains would be led into a small collection lake and from there would be circulated, ideally by wind pump, through a series of gravity-fed terraced reedbeds back to the lake.  This system would act as a flood buffer and would progressively cleanse the water through the reed roots. With the reduction of excessive fertilizers, reed quality would improve towards the final beds. The poorer quality reed would be utilised for fuel chaff or building insulation as in the prototype structure I have designed.

     Acid-tolerant reed and coppice would be at the centre of the system. Other crops would be on the border in more neutral soil. Short term produce would be thatching reed and renewable fuel from willow (investment return possibly within two years). Further fuel coppice could take between 3 to 7 years. Food crops could be from 2 years onwards up to 400 years depending on the crop. Reed will grow from the same roots every year, willow up to 7 years before becoming tired, but very easily propogated.

     Fuel crops are low level, low return, but commercially stable, and will become more so as the green impact bites globally. Research and development will take the quality end of the crop and turn it into high spec., valuable standardised building sections, totally green and sustainable, for the construction of prefabricated homes both for Ireland and for export. This will increase the value of the crop considerably. Modern scientific monitoring of the first prototype house will be carried out, to ascertain its durability and eco value, its thermal insulation properties, and its commercial viability. A similar scientific approach will be taken towards the cleansing of the environment and the benefits of the system for wildlife.

     Presently a considerable importation occurs annually of thatching reed and straw. This scheme would not only reduce imports but could produce exports. Reed and coppice timber has far greater potential than just thatching, and this should be explored.
 
     Training in traditional skills and agricultural methods would be central to the scheme, as would be the marriage of these green skills and materials with 21st century technology and design.

     The use of wind or water power would be employed for basic processing of fuel or wood pellets wherever possible.

     A storage and distribution centre would be established.

     The central system of water flow and drainage, once set up, could allow for sideways expansion of the plan, land space permitting, without the need for much further expense in the infrastructure, and the model, once proven, could be replicated any number of times throughout the country, but especially on otherwise-unproductive areas such as exhausted Bord na Mona turf bogs and boggy Coillte land. From quite small to very large areas would work, especially with the central collection and distribution warehouses to handle the national crop. Small farmers with areas of poor land could benefit greatly. Those research crops from the bordering fields which showed the best potential would be further developed either adjacently or on separate sites. The potential for wealth and jobs creation is vast, as is the environmental and ecological benefit from the scheme. Initial start-up costs would be very modest, and growth would be controllable. Each module would be small compared with the national scheme of the future, and as such the whole scheme would not fail due to one factor, such as rising fossil fuel costs. Massive single businesses, while financially very successful, are also prone to sudden catastrophic collapse. This scheme would start all from the same point, that is the growing of cellulosic materials, but would have sufficient diverse outlets to protect the system as a whole. 
  The plan I have devised is to take a small area of poor quality, saturated acid land, up to 20 acres, bordered by strips of better, less acid land up to a further 20 acres, although the scheme could well be established on a much smaller area. On this would be created a pilot project for the growing of various green products. Typically the site  would be level, low-lying, and surrounded by open drainage ditches. The bottom of these drains would be full of stagnant water for much of the year, heavily polluted with nitrates, phosphates, pathogens like crypto spiridium and e-coli, and many other organic and chemical substances accumulated from the surrounding district. Heavy rain and flood conditions would periodically flush this poison into the larger watercourses and rivers.
     Within 3 years I would expect to start harvesting several commercial crops and up to 7 years would see the full development of several more. The total achievements from the site would be as follows:

Renewable fuel with negative carbon footprint.
Green construction materials.
Research and development of green buildings.
A science and technology centre.
A website for the sharing of knowledge, skills and ideas.
Tourism.
Skills and craft training and application.
Low energy farming and harvesting.
Natural energy processing and manufacturing.
Allotments and therapy gardens.
Visitor centre.
Wildlife centre.
Carbon-negative food production.
Waste treatment.
Purification of ground water and environment.
Centre for culture and heritage.

     The stagnant drains would be led into a small collection lake and from there would be circulated, ideally by wind pump, through a series of gravity-fed terraced reedbeds back to the lake.  This system would act as a flood buffer and would progressively cleanse the water through the reed roots. With the reduction of excessive fertilizers, reed quality would improve towards the final beds. The poorer quality reed would be utilised for fuel chaff or building insulation as in the prototype structure I have designed.

     Acid-tolerant reed and coppice would be at the centre of the system. Other crops would be on the border in more neutral soil. Short term produce would be thatching reed and renewable fuel from willow (investment return possibly within two years). Further fuel coppice could take between 3 to 7 years. Food crops could be from 2 years onwards up to 400 years depending on the crop. Reed will grow from the same roots every year, willow up to 7 years before becoming tired, but very easily propogated.

     Fuel crops are low level, low return, but commercially stable, and will become more so as the green impact bites globally. Research and development will take the quality end of the crop and turn it into high spec., valuable standardised building sections, totally green and sustainable, for the construction of prefabricated homes both for Ireland and for export. This will increase the value of the crop considerably. Modern scientific monitoring of the first prototype house will be carried out, to ascertain its durability and eco value, its thermal insulation properties, and its commercial viability. A similar scientific approach will be taken towards the cleansing of the environment and the benefits of the system for wildlife.

     Presently a considerable importation occurs annually of thatching reed and straw. This scheme would not only reduce imports but could produce exports. Reed and coppice timber has far greater potential than just thatching, and this should be explored.
 
     Training in traditional skills and agricultural methods would be central to the scheme, as would be the marriage of these green skills and materials with 21st century technology and design.

     The use of wind or water power would be employed for basic processing of fuel or wood pellets wherever possible.

     A storage and distribution centre would be established.

     The central system of water flow and drainage, once set up, could allow for sideways expansion of the plan, land space permitting, without the need for much further expense in the infrastructure, and the model, once proven, could be replicated any number of times throughout the country, but especially on otherwise-unproductive areas such as exhausted Bord na Mona turf bogs and boggy Coillte land. From quite small to very large areas would work, especially with the central collection and distribution warehouses to handle the national crop. Small farmers with areas of poor land could benefit greatly. Those research crops from the bordering fields which showed the best potential would be further developed either adjacently or on separate sites. The potential for wealth and jobs creation is vast, as is the environmental and ecological benefit from the scheme. Initial start-up costs would be very modest, and growth would be controllable. Each module would be small compared with the national scheme of the future, and as such the whole scheme would not fail due to one factor, such as rising fossil fuel costs. Massive single businesses, while financially very successful, are also prone to sudden catastrophic collapse. This scheme would start all from the same point, that is the growing of cellulosic materials, but would have sufficient diverse outlets to protect the system as a whole. 
  The plan I have devised is to take a small area of poor quality, saturated acid land, up to 20 acres, bordered by strips of better, less acid land up to a further 20 acres, although the scheme could well be established on a much smaller area. On this would be created a pilot project for the growing of various green products. Typically the site  would be level, low-lying, and surrounded by open drainage ditches. The bottom of these drains would be full of stagnant water for much of the year, heavily polluted with nitrates, phosphates, pathogens like crypto spiridium and e-coli, and many other organic and chemical substances accumulated from the surrounding district. Heavy rain and flood conditions would periodically flush this poison into the larger watercourses and rivers.
     Within 3 years I would expect to start harvesting several commercial crops and up to 7 years would see the full development of several more. The total achievements from the site would be as follows:

Renewable fuel with negative carbon footprint.
Green construction materials.
Research and development of green buildings.
A science and technology centre.
A website for the sharing of knowledge, skills and ideas.
Tourism.
Skills and craft training and application.
Low energy farming and harvesting.
Natural energy processing and manufacturing.
Allotments and therapy gardens.
Visitor centre.
Wildlife centre.
Carbon-negative food production.
Waste treatment.
Purification of ground water and environment.
Centre for culture and heritage.

     The stagnant drains would be led into a small collection lake and from there would be circulated, ideally by wind pump, through a series of gravity-fed terraced reedbeds back to the lake.  This system would act as a flood buffer and would progressively cleanse the water through the reed roots. With the reduction of excessive fertilizers, reed quality would improve towards the final beds. The poorer quality reed would be utilised for fuel chaff or building insulation as in the prototype structure I have designed.

     Acid-tolerant reed and coppice would be at the centre of the system. Other crops would be on the border in more neutral soil. Short term produce would be thatching reed and renewable fuel from willow (investment return possibly within two years). Further fuel coppice could take between 3 to 7 years. Food crops could be from 2 years onwards up to 400 years depending on the crop. Reed will grow from the same roots every year, willow up to 7 years before becoming tired, but very easily propogated.

     Fuel crops are low level, low return, but commercially stable, and will become more so as the green impact bites globally. Research and development will take the quality end of the crop and turn it into high spec., valuable standardised building sections, totally green and sustainable, for the construction of prefabricated homes both for Ireland and for export. This will increase the value of the crop considerably. Modern scientific monitoring of the first prototype house will be carried out, to ascertain its durability and eco value, its thermal insulation properties, and its commercial viability. A similar scientific approach will be taken towards the cleansing of the environment and the benefits of the system for wildlife.

     Presently a considerable importation occurs annually of thatching reed and straw. This scheme would not only reduce imports but could produce exports. Reed and coppice timber has far greater potential than just thatching, and this should be explored.
 
     Training in traditional skills and agricultural methods would be central to the scheme, as would be the marriage of these green skills and materials with 21st century technology and design.

     The use of wind or water power would be employed for basic processing of fuel or wood pellets wherever possible.

     A storage and distribution centre would be established.

     The central system of water flow and drainage, once set up, could allow for sideways expansion of the plan, land space permitting, without the need for much further expense in the infrastructure, and the model, once proven, could be replicated any number of times throughout the country, but especially on otherwise-unproductive areas such as exhausted Bord na Mona turf bogs and boggy Coillte land. From quite small to very large areas would work, especially with the central collection and distribution warehouses to handle the national crop. Small farmers with areas of poor land could benefit greatly. Those research crops from the bordering fields which showed the best potential would be further developed either adjacently or on separate sites. The potential for wealth and jobs creation is vast, as is the environmental and ecological benefit from the scheme. Initial start-up costs would be very modest, and growth would be controllable. Each module would be small compared with the national scheme of the future, and as such the whole scheme would not fail due to one factor, such as rising fossil fuel costs. Massive single businesses, while financially very successful, are also prone to sudden catastrophic collapse. This scheme would start all from the same point, that is the growing of cellulosic materials, but would have sufficient diverse outlets to protect the system as a whole. 
  The plan I have devised is to take a small area of poor quality, saturated acid land, up to 20 acres, bordered by strips of better, less acid land up to a further 20 acres, although the scheme could well be established on a much smaller area. On this would be created a pilot project for the growing of various green products. Typically the site  would be level, low-lying, and surrounded by open drainage ditches. The bottom of these drains would be full of stagnant water for much of the year, heavily polluted with nitrates, phosphates, pathogens like crypto spiridium and e-coli, and many other organic and chemical substances accumulated from the surrounding district. Heavy rain and flood conditions would periodically flush this poison into the larger watercourses and rivers.
     Within 3 years I would expect to start harvesting several commercial crops and up to 7 years would see the full development of several more. The total achievements from the site would be as follows:

Renewable fuel with negative carbon footprint.
Green construction materials.
Research and development of green buildings.
A science and technology centre.
A website for the sharing of knowledge, skills and ideas.
Tourism.
Skills and craft training and application.
Low energy farming and harvesting.
Natural energy processing and manufacturing.
Allotments and therapy gardens.
Visitor centre.
Wildlife centre.
Carbon-negative food production.
Waste treatment.
Purification of ground water and environment.
Centre for culture and heritage.

     The stagnant drains would be led into a small collection lake and from there would be circulated, ideally by wind pump, through a series of gravity-fed terraced reedbeds back to the lake.  This system would act as a flood buffer and would progressively cleanse the water through the reed roots. With the reduction of excessive fertilizers, reed quality would improve towards the final beds. The poorer quality reed would be utilised for fuel chaff or building insulation as in the prototype structure I have designed.

     Acid-tolerant reed and coppice would be at the centre of the system. Other crops would be on the border in more neutral soil. Short term produce would be thatching reed and renewable fuel from willow (investment return possibly within two years). Further fuel coppice could take between 3 to 7 years. Food crops could be from 2 years onwards up to 400 years depending on the crop. Reed will grow from the same roots every year, willow up to 7 years before becoming tired, but very easily propogated.

     Fuel crops are low level, low return, but commercially stable, and will become more so as the green impact bites globally. Research and development will take the quality end of the crop and turn it into high spec., valuable standardised building sections, totally green and sustainable, for the construction of prefabricated homes both for Ireland and for export. This will increase the value of the crop considerably. Modern scientific monitoring of the first prototype house will be carried out, to ascertain its durability and eco value, its thermal insulation properties, and its commercial viability. A similar scientific approach will be taken towards the cleansing of the environment and the benefits of the system for wildlife.

     Presently a considerable importation occurs annually of thatching reed and straw. This scheme would not only reduce imports but could produce exports. Reed and coppice timber has far greater potential than just thatching, and this should be explored.
 
     Training in traditional skills and agricultural methods would be central to the scheme, as would be the marriage of these green skills and materials with 21st century technology and design.

     The use of wind or water power would be employed for basic processing of fuel or wood pellets wherever possible.

     A storage and distribution centre would be established.

     The central system of water flow and drainage, once set up, could allow for sideways expansion of the plan, land space permitting, without the need for much further expense in the infrastructure, and the model, once proven, could be replicated any number of times throughout the country, but especially on otherwise-unproductive areas such as exhausted Bord na Mona turf bogs and boggy Coillte land. From quite small to very large areas would work, especially with the central collection and distribution warehouses to handle the national crop. Small farmers with areas of poor land could benefit greatly. Those research crops from the bordering fields which showed the best potential would be further developed either adjacently or on separate sites. The potential for wealth and jobs creation is vast, as is the environmental and ecological benefit from the scheme. Initial start-up costs would be very modest, and growth would be controllable. Each module would be small compared with the national scheme of the future, and as such the whole scheme would not fail due to one factor, such as rising fossil fuel costs. Massive single businesses, while financially very successful, are also prone to sudden catastrophic collapse. This scheme would start all from the same point, that is the growing of cellulosic materials, but would have sufficient diverse outlets to protect the system as a whole. 
  The plan I have devised is to take a small area of poor quality, saturated acid land, up to 20 acres, bordered by strips of better, less acid land up to a further 20 acres, although the scheme could well be established on a much smaller area. On this would be created a pilot project for the growing of various green products. Typically the site  would be level, low-lying, and surrounded by open drainage ditches. The bottom of these drains would be full of stagnant water for much of the year, heavily polluted with nitrates, phosphates, pathogens like crypto spiridium and e-coli, and many other organic and chemical substances accumulated from the surrounding district. Heavy rain and flood conditions would periodically flush this poison into the larger watercourses and rivers.
     Within 3 years I would expect to start harvesting several commercial crops and up to 7 years would see the full development of several more. The total achievements from the site would be as follows:

Renewable fuel with negative carbon footprint.
Green construction materials.
Research and development of green buildings.
A science and technology centre.
A website for the sharing of knowledge, skills and ideas.
Tourism.
Skills and craft training and application.
Low energy farming and harvesting.
Natural energy processing and manufacturing.
Allotments and therapy gardens.
Visitor centre.
Wildlife centre.
Carbon-negative food production.
Waste treatment.
Purification of ground water and environment.
Centre for culture and heritage.

     The stagnant drains would be led into a small collection lake and from there would be circulated, ideally by wind pump, through a series of gravity-fed terraced reedbeds back to the lake.  This system would act as a flood buffer and would progressively cleanse the water through the reed roots. With the reduction of excessive fertilizers, reed quality would improve towards the final beds. The poorer quality reed would be utilised for fuel chaff or building insulation as in the prototype structure I have designed.

     Acid-tolerant reed and coppice would be at the centre of the system. Other crops would be on the border in more neutral soil. Short term produce would be thatching reed and renewable fuel from willow (investment return possibly within two years). Further fuel coppice could take between 3 to 7 years. Food crops could be from 2 years onwards up to 400 years depending on the crop. Reed will grow from the same roots every year, willow up to 7 years before becoming tired, but very easily propogated.

     Fuel crops are low level, low return, but commercially stable, and will become more so as the green impact bites globally. Research and development will take the quality end of the crop and turn it into high spec., valuable standardised building sections, totally green and sustainable, for the construction of prefabricated homes both for Ireland and for export. This will increase the value of the crop considerably. Modern scientific monitoring of the first prototype house will be carried out, to ascertain its durability and eco value, its thermal insulation properties, and its commercial viability. A similar scientific approach will be taken towards the cleansing of the environment and the benefits of the system for wildlife.

     Presently a considerable importation occurs annually of thatching reed and straw. This scheme would not only reduce imports but could produce exports. Reed and coppice timber has far greater potential than just thatching, and this should be explored.
 
     Training in traditional skills and agricultural methods would be central to the scheme, as would be the marriage of these green skills and materials with 21st century technology and design.

     The use of wind or water power would be employed for basic processing of fuel or wood pellets wherever possible.

     A storage and distribution centre would be established.

     The central system of water flow and drainage, once set up, could allow for sideways expansion of the plan, land space permitting, without the need for much further expense in the infrastructure, and the model, once proven, could be replicated any number of times throughout the country, but especially on otherwise-unproductive areas such as exhausted Bord na Mona turf bogs and boggy Coillte land. From quite small to very large areas would work, especially with the central collection and distribution warehouses to handle the national crop. Small farmers with areas of poor land could benefit greatly. Those research crops from the bordering fields which showed the best potential would be further developed either adjacently or on separate sites. The potential for wealth and jobs creation is vast, as is the environmental and ecological benefit from the scheme. Initial start-up costs would be very modest, and growth would be controllable. Each module would be small compared with the national scheme of the future, and as such the whole scheme would not fail due to one factor, such as rising fossil fuel costs. Massive single businesses, while financially very successful, are also prone to sudden catastrophic collapse. This scheme would start all from the same point, that is the growing of cellulosic materials, but would have sufficient diverse outlets to protect the system as a whole. 
  The plan I have devised is to take a small area of poor quality, saturated acid land, up to 20 acres, bordered by strips of better, less acid land up to a further 20 acres, although the scheme could well be established on a much smaller area. On this would be created a pilot project for the growing of various green products. Typically the site  would be level, low-lying, and surrounded by open drainage ditches. The bottom of these drains would be full of stagnant water for much of the year, heavily polluted with nitrates, phosphates, pathogens like crypto spiridium and e-coli, and many other organic and chemical substances accumulated from the surrounding district. Heavy rain and flood conditions would periodically flush this poison into the larger watercourses and rivers.
     Within 3 years I would expect to start harvesting several commercial crops and up to 7 years would see the full development of several more. The total achievements from the site would be as follows:

Renewable fuel with negative carbon footprint.
Green construction materials.
Research and development of green buildings.
A science and technology centre.
A website for the sharing of knowledge, skills and ideas.
Tourism.
Skills and craft training and application.
Low energy farming and harvesting.
Natural energy processing and manufacturing.
Allotments and therapy gardens.
Visitor centre.
Wildlife centre.
Carbon-negative food production.
Waste treatment.
Purification of ground water and environment.
Centre for culture and heritage.

     The stagnant drains would be led into a small collection lake and from there would be circulated, ideally by wind pump, through a series of gravity-fed terraced reedbeds back to the lake.  This system would act as a flood buffer and would progressively cleanse the water through the reed roots. With the reduction of excessive fertilizers, reed quality would improve towards the final beds. The poorer quality reed would be utilised for fuel chaff or building insulation as in the prototype structure I have designed.

     Acid-tolerant reed and coppice would be at the centre of the system. Other crops would be on the border in more neutral soil. Short term produce would be thatching reed and renewable fuel from willow (investment return possibly within two years). Further fuel coppice could take between 3 to 7 years. Food crops could be from 2 years onwards up to 400 years depending on the crop. Reed will grow from the same roots every year, willow up to 7 years before becoming tired, but very easily propogated.

     Fuel crops are low level, low return, but commercially stable, and will become more so as the green impact bites globally. Research and development will take the quality end of the crop and turn it into high spec., valuable standardised building sections, totally green and sustainable, for the construction of prefabricated homes both for Ireland and for export. This will increase the value of the crop considerably. Modern scientific monitoring of the first prototype house will be carried out, to ascertain its durability and eco value, its thermal insulation properties, and its commercial viability. A similar scientific approach will be taken towards the cleansing of the environment and the benefits of the system for wildlife.

     Presently a considerable importation occurs annually of thatching reed and straw. This scheme would not only reduce imports but could produce exports. Reed and coppice timber has far greater potential than just thatching, and this should be explored.
 
     Training in traditional skills and agricultural methods would be central to the scheme, as would be the marriage of these green skills and materials with 21st century technology and design.

     The use of wind or water power would be employed for basic processing of fuel or wood pellets wherever possible.

     A storage and distribution centre would be established.

     The central system of water flow and drainage, once set up, could allow for sideways expansion of the plan, land space permitting, without the need for much further expense in the infrastructure, and the model, once proven, could be replicated any number of times throughout the country, but especially on otherwise-unproductive areas such as exhausted Bord na Mona turf bogs and boggy Coillte land. From quite small to very large areas would work, especially with the central collection and distribution warehouses to handle the national crop. Small farmers with areas of poor land could benefit greatly. Those research crops from the bordering fields which showed the best potential would be further developed either adjacently or on separate sites. The potential for wealth and jobs creation is vast, as is the environmental and ecological benefit from the scheme. Initial start-up costs would be very modest, and growth would be controllable. Each module would be small compared with the national scheme of the future, and as such the whole scheme would not fail due to one factor, such as rising fossil fuel costs. Massive single businesses, while financially very successful, are also prone to sudden catastrophic collapse. This scheme would start all from the same point, that is the growing of cellulosic materials, but would have sufficient diverse outlets to protect the system as a whole. 
  The plan I have devised is to take a small area of poor quality, saturated acid land, up to 20 acres, bordered by strips of better, less acid land up to a further 20 acres, although the scheme could well be established on a much smaller area. On this would be created a pilot project for the growing of various green products. Typically the site  would be level, low-lying, and surrounded by open drainage ditches. The bottom of these drains would be full of stagnant water for much of the year, heavily polluted with nitrates, phosphates, pathogens like crypto spiridium and e-coli, and many other organic and chemical substances accumulated from the surrounding district. Heavy rain and flood conditions would periodically flush this poison into the larger watercourses and rivers.
     Within 3 years I would expect to start harvesting several commercial crops and up to 7 years would see the full development of several more. The total achievements from the site would be as follows:

Renewable fuel with negative carbon footprint.
Green construction materials.
Research and development of green buildings.
A science and technology centre.
A website for the sharing of knowledge, skills and ideas.
Tourism.
Skills and craft training and application.
Low energy farming and harvesting.
Natural energy processing and manufacturing.
Allotments and therapy gardens.
Visitor centre.
Wildlife centre.
Carbon-negative food production.
Waste treatment.
Purification of ground water and environment.
Centre for culture and heritage.

     The stagnant drains would be led into a small collection lake and from there would be circulated, ideally by wind pump, through a series of gravity-fed terraced reedbeds back to the lake.  This system would act as a flood buffer and would progressively cleanse the water through the reed roots. With the reduction of excessive fertilizers, reed quality would improve towards the final beds. The poorer quality reed would be utilised for fuel chaff or building insulation as in the prototype structure I have designed.

     Acid-tolerant reed and coppice would be at the centre of the system. Other crops would be on the border in more neutral soil. Short term produce would be thatching reed and renewable fuel from willow (investment return possibly within two years). Further fuel coppice could take between 3 to 7 years. Food crops could be from 2 years onwards up to 400 years depending on the crop. Reed will grow from the same roots every year, willow up to 7 years before becoming tired, but very easily propogated.

     Fuel crops are low level, low return, but commercially stable, and will become more so as the green impact bites globally. Research and development will take the quality end of the crop and turn it into high spec., valuable standardised building sections, totally green and sustainable, for the construction of prefabricated homes both for Ireland and for export. This will increase the value of the crop considerably. Modern scientific monitoring of the first prototype house will be carried out, to ascertain its durability and eco value, its thermal insulation properties, and its commercial viability. A similar scientific approach will be taken towards the cleansing of the environment and the benefits of the system for wildlife.

     Presently a considerable importation occurs annually of thatching reed and straw. This scheme would not only reduce imports but could produce exports. Reed and coppice timber has far greater potential than just thatching, and this should be explored.
 
     Training in traditional skills and agricultural methods would be central to the scheme, as would be the marriage of these green skills and materials with 21st century technology and design.

     The use of wind or water power would be employed for basic processing of fuel or wood pellets wherever possible.

     A storage and distribution centre would be established.

     The central system of water flow and drainage, once set up, could allow for sideways expansion of the plan, land space permitting, without the need for much further expense in the infrastructure, and the model, once proven, could be replicated any number of times throughout the country, but especially on otherwise-unproductive areas such as exhausted Bord na Mona turf bogs and boggy Coillte land. From quite small to very large areas would work, especially with the central collection and distribution warehouses to handle the national crop. Small farmers with areas of poor land could benefit greatly. Those research crops from the bordering fields which showed the best potential would be further developed either adjacently or on separate sites. The potential for wealth and jobs creation is vast, as is the environmental and ecological benefit from the scheme. Initial start-up costs would be very modest, and growth would be controllable. Each module would be small compared with the national scheme of the future, and as such the whole scheme would not fail due to one factor, such as rising fossil fuel costs. Massive single businesses, while financially very successful, are also prone to sudden catastrophic collapse. This scheme would start all from the same point, that is the growing of cellulosic materials, but would have sufficient diverse outlets to protect the system as a whole. 
  The plan I have devised is to take a small area of poor quality, saturated acid land, up to 20 acres, bordered by strips of better, less acid land up to a further 20 acres, although the scheme could well be established on a much smaller area. On this would be created a pilot project for the growing of various green products. Typically the site  would be level, low-lying, and surrounded by open drainage ditches. The bottom of these drains would be full of stagnant water for much of the year, heavily polluted with nitrates, phosphates, pathogens like crypto spiridium and e-coli, and many other organic and chemical substances accumulated from the surrounding district. Heavy rain and flood conditions would periodically flush this poison into the larger watercourses and rivers.
     Within 3 years I would expect to start harvesting several commercial crops and up to 7 years would see the full development of several more. The total achievements from the site would be as follows:

Renewable fuel with negative carbon footprint.
Green construction materials.
Research and development of green buildings.
A science and technology centre.
A website for the sharing of knowledge, skills and ideas.
Tourism.
Skills and craft training and application.
Low energy farming and harvesting.
Natural energy processing and manufacturing.
Allotments and therapy gardens.
Visitor centre.
Wildlife centre.
Carbon-negative food production.
Waste treatment.
Purification of ground water and environment.
Centre for culture and heritage.

     The stagnant drains would be led into a small collection lake and from there would be circulated, ideally by wind pump, through a series of gravity-fed terraced reedbeds back to the lake.  This system would act as a flood buffer and would progressively cleanse the water through the reed roots. With the reduction of excessive fertilizers, reed quality would improve towards the final beds. The poorer quality reed would be utilised for fuel chaff or building insulation as in the prototype structure I have designed.

     Acid-tolerant reed and coppice would be at the centre of the system. Other crops would be on the border in more neutral soil. Short term produce would be thatching reed and renewable fuel from willow (investment return possibly within two years). Further fuel coppice could take between 3 to 7 years. Food crops could be from 2 years onwards up to 400 years depending on the crop. Reed will grow from the same roots every year, willow up to 7 years before becoming tired, but very easily propogated.

     Fuel crops are low level, low return, but commercially stable, and will become more so as the green impact bites globally. Research and development will take the quality end of the crop and turn it into high spec., valuable standardised building sections, totally green and sustainable, for the construction of prefabricated homes both for Ireland and for export. This will increase the value of the crop considerably. Modern scientific monitoring of the first prototype house will be carried out, to ascertain its durability and eco value, its thermal insulation properties, and its commercial viability. A similar scientific approach will be taken towards the cleansing of the environment and the benefits of the system for wildlife.

     Presently a considerable importation occurs annually of thatching reed and straw. This scheme would not only reduce imports but could produce exports. Reed and coppice timber has far greater potential than just thatching, and this should be explored.
 
     Training in traditional skills and agricultural methods would be central to the scheme, as would be the marriage of these green skills and materials with 21st century technology and design.

     The use of wind or water power would be employed for basic processing of fuel or wood pellets wherever possible.

     A storage and distribution centre would be established.

     The central system of water flow and drainage, once set up, could allow for sideways expansion of the plan, land space permitting, without the need for much further expense in the infrastructure, and the model, once proven, could be replicated any number of times throughout the country, but especially on otherwise-unproductive areas such as exhausted Bord na Mona turf bogs and boggy Coillte land. From quite small to very large areas would work, especially with the central collection and distribution warehouses to handle the national crop. Small farmers with areas of poor land could benefit greatly. Those research crops from the bordering fields which showed the best potential would be further developed either adjacently or on separate sites. The potential for wealth and jobs creation is vast, as is the environmental and ecological benefit from the scheme. Initial start-up costs would be very modest, and growth would be controllable. Each module would be small compared with the national scheme of the future, and as such the whole scheme would not fail due to one factor, such as rising fossil fuel costs. Massive single businesses, while financially very successful, are also prone to sudden catastrophic collapse. This scheme would start all from the same point, that is the growing of cellulosic materials, but would have sufficient diverse outlets to protect the system as a whole. 
  The plan I have devised is to take a small area of poor quality, saturated acid land, up to 20 acres, bordered by strips of better, less acid land up to a further 20 acres, although the scheme could well be established on a much smaller area. On this would be created a pilot project for the growing of various green products. Typically the site  would be level, low-lying, and surrounded by open drainage ditches. The bottom of these drains would be full of stagnant water for much of the year, heavily polluted with nitrates, phosphates, pathogens like crypto spiridium and e-coli, and many other organic and chemical substances accumulated from the surrounding district. Heavy rain and flood conditions would periodically flush this poison into the larger watercourses and rivers.
     Within 3 years I would expect to start harvesting several commercial crops and up to 7 years would see the full development of several more. The total achievements from the site would be as follows:

Renewable fuel with negative carbon footprint.
Green construction materials.
Research and development of green buildings.
A science and technology centre.
A website for the sharing of knowledge, skills and ideas.
Tourism.
Skills and craft training and application.
Low energy farming and harvesting.
Natural energy processing and manufacturing.
Allotments and therapy gardens.
Visitor centre.
Wildlife centre.
Carbon-negative food production.
Waste treatment.
Purification of ground water and environment.
Centre for culture and heritage.

     The stagnant drains would be led into a small collection lake and from there would be circulated, ideally by wind pump, through a series of gravity-fed terraced reedbeds back to the lake.  This system would act as a flood buffer and would progressively cleanse the water through the reed roots. With the reduction of excessive fertilizers, reed quality would improve towards the final beds. The poorer quality reed would be utilised for fuel chaff or building insulation as in the prototype structure I have designed.

     Acid-tolerant reed and coppice would be at the centre of the system. Other crops would be on the border in more neutral soil. Short term produce would be thatching reed and renewable fuel from willow (investment return possibly within two years). Further fuel coppice could take between 3 to 7 years. Food crops could be from 2 years onwards up to 400 years depending on the crop. Reed will grow from the same roots every year, willow up to 7 years before becoming tired, but very easily propogated.

     Fuel crops are low level, low return, but commercially stable, and will become more so as the green impact bites globally. Research and development will take the quality end of the crop and turn it into high spec., valuable standardised building sections, totally green and sustainable, for the construction of prefabricated homes both for Ireland and for export. This will increase the value of the crop considerably. Modern scientific monitoring of the first prototype house will be carried out, to ascertain its durability and eco value, its thermal insulation properties, and its commercial viability. A similar scientific approach will be taken towards the cleansing of the environment and the benefits of the system for wildlife.

     Presently a considerable importation occurs annually of thatching reed and straw. This scheme would not only reduce imports but could produce exports. Reed and coppice timber has far greater potential than just thatching, and this should be explored.
 
     Training in traditional skills and agricultural methods would be central to the scheme, as would be the marriage of these green skills and materials with 21st century technology and design.

     The use of wind or water power would be employed for basic processing of fuel or wood pellets wherever possible.

     A storage and distribution centre would be established.

     The central system of water flow and drainage, once set up, could allow for sideways expansion of the plan, land space permitting, without the need for much further expense in the infrastructure, and the model, once proven, could be replicated any number of times throughout the country, but especially on otherwise-unproductive areas such as exhausted Bord na Mona turf bogs and boggy Coillte land. From quite small to very large areas would work, especially with the central collection and distribution warehouses to handle the national crop. Small farmers with areas of poor land could benefit greatly. Those research crops from the bordering fields which showed the best potential would be further developed either adjacently or on separate sites. The potential for wealth and jobs creation is vast, as is the environmental and ecological benefit from the scheme. Initial start-up costs would be very modest, and growth would be controllable. Each module would be small compared with the national scheme of the future, and as such the whole scheme would not fail due to one factor, such as rising fossil fuel costs. Massive single businesses, while financially very successful, are also prone to sudden catastrophic collapse. This scheme would start all from the same point, that is the growing of cellulosic materials, but would have sufficient diverse outlets to protect the system as a whole. 
  The plan I have devised is to take a small area of poor quality, saturated acid land, up to 20 acres, bordered by strips of better, less acid land up to a further 20 acres, although the scheme could well be established on a much smaller area. On this would be created a pilot project for the growing of various green products. Typically the site  would be level, low-lying, and surrounded by open drainage ditches. The bottom of these drains would be full of stagnant water for much of the year, heavily polluted with nitrates, phosphates, pathogens like crypto spiridium and e-coli, and many other organic and chemical substances accumulated from the surrounding district. Heavy rain and flood conditions would periodically flush this poison into the larger watercourses and rivers.
     Within 3 years I would expect to start harvesting several commercial crops and up to 7 years would see the full development of several more. The total achievements from the site would be as follows:

Renewable fuel with negative carbon footprint.
Green construction materials.
Research and development of green buildings.
A science and technology centre.
A website for the sharing of knowledge, skills and ideas.
Tourism.
Skills and craft training and application.
Low energy farming and harvesting.
Natural energy processing and manufacturing.
Allotments and therapy gardens.
Visitor centre.
Wildlife centre.
Carbon-negative food production.
Waste treatment.
Purification of ground water and environment.
Centre for culture and heritage.

     The stagnant drains would be led into a small collection lake and from there would be circulated, ideally by wind pump, through a series of gravity-fed terraced reedbeds back to the lake.  This system would act as a flood buffer and would progressively cleanse the water through the reed roots. With the reduction of excessive fertilizers, reed quality would improve towards the final beds. The poorer quality reed would be utilised for fuel chaff or building insulation as in the prototype structure I have designed.

     Acid-tolerant reed and coppice would be at the centre of the system. Other crops would be on the border in more neutral soil. Short term produce would be thatching reed and renewable fuel from willow (investment return possibly within two years). Further fuel coppice could take between 3 to 7 years. Food crops could be from 2 years onwards up to 400 years depending on the crop. Reed will grow from the same roots every year, willow up to 7 years before becoming tired, but very easily propogated.

     Fuel crops are low level, low return, but commercially stable, and will become more so as the green impact bites globally. Research and development will take the quality end of the crop and turn it into high spec., valuable standardised building sections, totally green and sustainable, for the construction of prefabricated homes both for Ireland and for export. This will increase the value of the crop considerably. Modern scientific monitoring of the first prototype house will be carried out, to ascertain its durability and eco value, its thermal insulation properties, and its commercial viability. A similar scientific approach will be taken towards the cleansing of the environment and the benefits of the system for wildlife.

     Presently a considerable importation occurs annually of thatching reed and straw. This scheme would not only reduce imports but could produce exports. Reed and coppice timber has far greater potential than just thatching, and this should be explored.
 
     Training in traditional skills and agricultural methods would be central to the scheme, as would be the marriage of these green skills and materials with 21st century technology and design.

     The use of wind or water power would be employed for basic processing of fuel or wood pellets wherever possible.

     A storage and distribution centre would be established.

     The central system of water flow and drainage, once set up, could allow for sideways expansion of the plan, land space permitting, without the need for much further expense in the infrastructure, and the model, once proven, could be replicated any number of times throughout the country, but especially on otherwise-unproductive areas such as exhausted Bord na Mona turf bogs and boggy Coillte land. From quite small to very large areas would work, especially with the central collection and distribution warehouses to handle the national crop. Small farmers with areas of poor land could benefit greatly. Those research crops from the bordering fields which showed the best potential would be further developed either adjacently or on separate sites. The potential for wealth and jobs creation is vast, as is the environmental and ecological benefit from the scheme. Initial start-up costs would be very modest, and growth would be controllable. Each module would be small compared with the national scheme of the future, and as such the whole scheme would not fail due to one factor, such as rising fossil fuel costs. Massive single businesses, while financially very successful, are also prone to sudden catastrophic collapse. This scheme would start all from the same point, that is the growing of cellulosic materials, but would have sufficient diverse outlets to protect the system as a whole. 
  The plan I have devised is to take a small area of poor quality, saturated acid land, up to 20 acres, bordered by strips of better, less acid land up to a further 20 acres, although the scheme could well be established on a much smaller area. On this would be created a pilot project for the growing of various green products. Typically the site  would be level, low-lying, and surrounded by open drainage ditches. The bottom of these drains would be full of stagnant water for much of the year, heavily polluted with nitrates, phosphates, pathogens like crypto spiridium and e-coli, and many other organic and chemical substances accumulated from the surrounding district. Heavy rain and flood conditions would periodically flush this poison into the larger watercourses and rivers.
     Within 3 years I would expect to start harvesting several commercial crops and up to 7 years would see the full development of several more. The total achievements from the site would be as follows:

Renewable fuel with negative carbon footprint.
Green construction materials.
Research and development of green buildings.
A science and technology centre.
A website for the sharing of knowledge, skills and ideas.
Tourism.
Skills and craft training and application.
Low energy farming and harvesting.
Natural energy processing and manufacturing.
Allotments and therapy gardens.
Visitor centre.
Wildlife centre.
Carbon-negative food production.
Waste treatment.
Purification of ground water and environment.
Centre for culture and heritage.

     The stagnant drains would be led into a small collection lake and from there would be circulated, ideally by wind pump, through a series of gravity-fed terraced reedbeds back to the lake.  This system would act as a flood buffer and would progressively cleanse the water through the reed roots. With the reduction of excessive fertilizers, reed quality would improve towards the final beds. The poorer quality reed would be utilised for fuel chaff or building insulation as in the prototype structure I have designed.

     Acid-tolerant reed and coppice would be at the centre of the system. Other crops would be on the border in more neutral soil. Short term produce would be thatching reed and renewable fuel from willow (investment return possibly within two years). Further fuel coppice could take between 3 to 7 years. Food crops could be from 2 years onwards up to 400 years depending on the crop. Reed will grow from the same roots every year, willow up to 7 years before becoming tired, but very easily propogated.

     Fuel crops are low level, low return, but commercially stable, and will become more so as the green impact bites globally. Research and development will take the quality end of the crop and turn it into high spec., valuable standardised building sections, totally green and sustainable, for the construction of prefabricated homes both for Ireland and for export. This will increase the value of the crop considerably. Modern scientific monitoring of the first prototype house will be carried out, to ascertain its durability and eco value, its thermal insulation properties, and its commercial viability. A similar scientific approach will be taken towards the cleansing of the environment and the benefits of the system for wildlife.

     Presently a considerable importation occurs annually of thatching reed and straw. This scheme would not only reduce imports but could produce exports. Reed and coppice timber has far greater potential than just thatching, and this should be explored.
 
     Training in traditional skills and agricultural methods would be central to the scheme, as would be the marriage of these green skills and materials with 21st century technology and design.

     The use of wind or water power would be employed for basic processing of fuel or wood pellets wherever possible.

     A storage and distribution centre would be established.

     The central system of water flow and drainage, once set up, could allow for sideways expansion of the plan, land space permitting, without the need for much further expense in the infrastructure, and the model, once proven, could be replicated any number of times throughout the country, but especially on otherwise-unproductive areas such as exhausted Bord na Mona turf bogs and boggy Coillte land. From quite small to very large areas would work, especially with the central collection and distribution warehouses to handle the national crop. Small farmers with areas of poor land could benefit greatly. Those research crops from the bordering fields which showed the best potential would be further developed either adjacently or on separate sites. The potential for wealth and jobs creation is vast, as is the environmental and ecological benefit from the scheme. Initial start-up costs would be very modest, and growth would be controllable. Each module would be small compared with the national scheme of the future, and as such the whole scheme would not fail due to one factor, such as rising fossil fuel costs. Massive single businesses, while financially very successful, are also prone to sudden catastrophic collapse. This scheme would start all from the same point, that is the growing of cellulosic materials, but would have sufficient diverse outlets to protect the system as a whole. 
  The plan I have devised is to take a small area of poor quality, saturated acid land, up to 20 acres, bordered by strips of better, less acid land up to a further 20 acres, although the scheme could well be established on a much smaller area. On this would be created a pilot project for the growing of various green products. Typically the site  would be level, low-lying, and surrounded by open drainage ditches. The bottom of these drains would be full of stagnant water for much of the year, heavily polluted with nitrates, phosphates, pathogens like crypto spiridium and e-coli, and many other organic and chemical substances accumulated from the surrounding district. Heavy rain and flood conditions would periodically flush this poison into the larger watercourses and rivers.
     Within 3 years I would expect to start harvesting several commercial crops and up to 7 years would see the full development of several more. The total achievements from the site would be as follows:

Renewable fuel with negative carbon footprint.
Green construction materials.
Research and development of green buildings.
A science and technology centre.
A website for the sharing of knowledge, skills and ideas.
Tourism.
Skills and craft training and application.
Low energy farming and harvesting.
Natural energy processing and manufacturing.
Allotments and therapy gardens.
Visitor centre.
Wildlife centre.
Carbon-negative food production.
Waste treatment.
Purification of ground water and environment.
Centre for culture and heritage.

     The stagnant drains would be led into a small collection lake and from there would be circulated, ideally by wind pump, through a series of gravity-fed terraced reedbeds back to the lake.  This system would act as a flood buffer and would progressively cleanse the water through the reed roots. With the reduction of excessive fertilizers, reed quality would improve towards the final beds. The poorer quality reed would be utilised for fuel chaff or building insulation as in the prototype structure I have designed.

     Acid-tolerant reed and coppice would be at the centre of the system. Other crops would be on the border in more neutral soil. Short term produce would be thatching reed and renewable fuel from willow (investment return possibly within two years). Further fuel coppice could take between 3 to 7 years. Food crops could be from 2 years onwards up to 400 years depending on the crop. Reed will grow from the same roots every year, willow up to 7 years before becoming tired, but very easily propogated.

     Fuel crops are low level, low return, but commercially stable, and will become more so as the green impact bites globally. Research and development will take the quality end of the crop and turn it into high spec., valuable standardised building sections, totally green and sustainable, for the construction of prefabricated homes both for Ireland and for export. This will increase the value of the crop considerably. Modern scientific monitoring of the first prototype house will be carried out, to ascertain its durability and eco value, its thermal insulation properties, and its commercial viability. A similar scientific approach will be taken towards the cleansing of the environment and the benefits of the system for wildlife.

     Presently a considerable importation occurs annually of thatching reed and straw. This scheme would not only reduce imports but could produce exports. Reed and coppice timber has far greater potential than just thatching, and this should be explored.
 
     Training in traditional skills and agricultural methods would be central to the scheme, as would be the marriage of these green skills and materials with 21st century technology and design.

     The use of wind or water power would be employed for basic processing of fuel or wood pellets wherever possible.

     A storage and distribution centre would be established.

     The central system of water flow and drainage, once set up, could allow for sideways expansion of the plan, land space permitting, without the need for much further expense in the infrastructure, and the model, once proven, could be replicated any number of times throughout the country, but especially on otherwise-unproductive areas such as exhausted Bord na Mona turf bogs and boggy Coillte land. From quite small to very large areas would work, especially with the central collection and distribution warehouses to handle the national crop. Small farmers with areas of poor land could benefit greatly. Those research crops from the bordering fields which showed the best potential would be further developed either adjacently or on separate sites. The potential for wealth and jobs creation is vast, as is the environmental and ecological benefit from the scheme. Initial start-up costs would be very modest, and growth would be controllable. Each module would be small compared with the national scheme of the future, and as such the whole scheme would not fail due to one factor, such as rising fossil fuel costs. Massive single businesses, while financially very successful, are also prone to sudden catastrophic collapse. This scheme would start all from the same point, that is the growing of cellulosic materials, but would have sufficient diverse outlets to protect the system as a whole. 
  The plan I have devised is to take a small area of poor quality, saturated acid land, up to 20 acres, bordered by strips of better, less acid land up to a further 20 acres, although the scheme could well be established on a much smaller area. On this would be created a pilot project for the growing of various green products. Typically the site  would be level, low-lying, and surrounded by open drainage ditches. The bottom of these drains would be full of stagnant water for much of the year, heavily polluted with nitrates, phosphates, pathogens like crypto spiridium and e-coli, and many other organic and chemical substances accumulated from the surrounding district. Heavy rain and flood conditions would periodically flush this poison into the larger watercourses and rivers.
     Within 3 years I would expect to start harvesting several commercial crops and up to 7 years would see the full development of several more. The total achievements from the site would be as follows:

Renewable fuel with negative carbon footprint.
Green construction materials.
Research and development of green buildings.
A science and technology centre.
A website for the sharing of knowledge, skills and ideas.
Tourism.
Skills and craft training and application.
Low energy farming and harvesting.
Natural energy processing and manufacturing.
Allotments and therapy gardens.
Visitor centre.
Wildlife centre.
Carbon-negative food production.
Waste treatment.
Purification of ground water and environment.
Centre for culture and heritage.

     The stagnant drains would be led into a small collection lake and from there would be circulated, ideally by wind pump, through a series of gravity-fed terraced reedbeds back to the lake.  This system would act as a flood buffer and would progressively cleanse the water through the reed roots. With the reduction of excessive fertilizers, reed quality would improve towards the final beds. The poorer quality reed would be utilised for fuel chaff or building insulation as in the prototype structure I have designed.

     Acid-tolerant reed and coppice would be at the centre of the system. Other crops would be on the border in more neutral soil. Short term produce would be thatching reed and renewable fuel from willow (investment return possibly within two years). Further fuel coppice could take between 3 to 7 years. Food crops could be from 2 years onwards up to 400 years depending on the crop. Reed will grow from the same roots every year, willow up to 7 years before becoming tired, but very easily propogated.

     Fuel crops are low level, low return, but commercially stable, and will become more so as the green impact bites globally. Research and development will take the quality end of the crop and turn it into high spec., valuable standardised building sections, totally green and sustainable, for the construction of prefabricated homes both for Ireland and for export. This will increase the value of the crop considerably. Modern scientific monitoring of the first prototype house will be carried out, to ascertain its durability and eco value, its thermal insulation properties, and its commercial viability. A similar scientific approach will be taken towards the cleansing of the environment and the benefits of the system for wildlife.

     Presently a considerable importation occurs annually of thatching reed and straw. This scheme would not only reduce imports but could produce exports. Reed and coppice timber has far greater potential than just thatching, and this should be explored.
 
     Training in traditional skills and agricultural methods would be central to the scheme, as would be the marriage of these green skills and materials with 21st century technology and design.

     The use of wind or water power would be employed for basic processing of fuel or wood pellets wherever possible.

     A storage and distribution centre would be established.

     The central system of water flow and drainage, once set up, could allow for sideways expansion of the plan, land space permitting, without the need for much further expense in the infrastructure, and the model, once proven, could be replicated any number of times throughout the country, but especially on otherwise-unproductive areas such as exhausted Bord na Mona turf bogs and boggy Coillte land. From quite small to very large areas would work, especially with the central collection and distribution warehouses to handle the national crop. Small farmers with areas of poor land could benefit greatly. Those research crops from the bordering fields which showed the best potential would be further developed either adjacently or on separate sites. The potential for wealth and jobs creation is vast, as is the environmental and ecological benefit from the scheme. Initial start-up costs would be very modest, and growth would be controllable. Each module would be small compared with the national scheme of the future, and as such the whole scheme would not fail due to one factor, such as rising fossil fuel costs. Massive single businesses, while financially very successful, are also prone to sudden catastrophic collapse. This scheme would start all from the same point, that is the growing of cellulosic materials, but would have sufficient diverse outlets to protect the system as a whole. 
  The plan I have devised is to take a small area of poor quality, saturated acid land, up to 20 acres, bordered by strips of better, less acid land up to a further 20 acres, although the scheme could well be established on a much smaller area. On this would be created a pilot project for the growing of various green products. Typically the site  would be level, low-lying, and surrounded by open drainage ditches. The bottom of these drains would be full of stagnant water for much of the year, heavily polluted with nitrates, phosphates, pathogens like crypto spiridium and e-coli, and many other organic and chemical substances accumulated from the surrounding district. Heavy rain and flood conditions would periodically flush this poison into the larger watercourses and rivers.
     Within 3 years I would expect to start harvesting several commercial crops and up to 7 years would see the full development of several more. The total achievements from the site would be as follows:

Renewable fuel with negative carbon footprint.
Green construction materials.
Research and development of green buildings.
A science and technology centre.
A website for the sharing of knowledge, skills and ideas.
Tourism.
Skills and craft training and application.
Low energy farming and harvesting.
Natural energy processing and manufacturing.
Allotments and therapy gardens.
Visitor centre.
Wildlife centre.
Carbon-negative food production.
Waste treatment.
Purification of ground water and environment.
Centre for culture and heritage.

     The stagnant drains would be led into a small collection lake and from there would be circulated, ideally by wind pump, through a series of gravity-fed terraced reedbeds back to the lake.  This system would act as a flood buffer and would progressively cleanse the water through the reed roots. With the reduction of excessive fertilizers, reed quality would improve towards the final beds. The poorer quality reed would be utilised for fuel chaff or building insulation as in the prototype structure I have designed.

     Acid-tolerant reed and coppice would be at the centre of the system. Other crops would be on the border in more neutral soil. Short term produce would be thatching reed and renewable fuel from willow (investment return possibly within two years). Further fuel coppice could take between 3 to 7 years. Food crops could be from 2 years onwards up to 400 years depending on the crop. Reed will grow from the same roots every year, willow up to 7 years before becoming tired, but very easily propogated.

     Fuel crops are low level, low return, but commercially stable, and will become more so as the green impact bites globally. Research and development will take the quality end of the crop and turn it into high spec., valuable standardised building sections, totally green and sustainable, for the construction of prefabricated homes both for Ireland and for export. This will increase the value of the crop considerably. Modern scientific monitoring of the first prototype house will be carried out, to ascertain its durability and eco value, its thermal insulation properties, and its commercial viability. A similar scientific approach will be taken towards the cleansing of the environment and the benefits of the system for wildlife.

     Presently a considerable importation occurs annually of thatching reed and straw. This scheme would not only reduce imports but could produce exports. Reed and coppice timber has far greater potential than just thatching, and this should be explored.
 
     Training in traditional skills and agricultural methods would be central to the scheme, as would be the marriage of these green skills and materials with 21st century technology and design.

     The use of wind or water power would be employed for basic processing of fuel or wood pellets wherever possible.

     A storage and distribution centre would be established.

     The central system of water flow and drainage, once set up, could allow for sideways expansion of the plan, land space permitting, without the need for much further expense in the infrastructure, and the model, once proven, could be replicated any number of times throughout the country, but especially on otherwise-unproductive areas such as exhausted Bord na Mona turf bogs and boggy Coillte land. From quite small to very large areas would work, especially with the central collection and distribution warehouses to handle the national crop. Small farmers with areas of poor land could benefit greatly. Those research crops from the bordering fields which showed the best potential would be further developed either adjacently or on separate sites. The potential for wealth and jobs creation is vast, as is the environmental and ecological benefit from the scheme. Initial start-up costs would be very modest, and growth would be controllable. Each module would be small compared with the national scheme of the future, and as such the whole scheme would not fail due to one factor, such as rising fossil fuel costs. Massive single businesses, while financially very successful, are also prone to sudden catastrophic collapse. This scheme would start all from the same point, that is the growing of cellulosic materials, but would have sufficient diverse outlets to protect the system as a whole. 
  The plan I have devised is to take a small area of poor quality, saturated acid land, up to 20 acres, bordered by strips of better, less acid land up to a further 20 acres, although the scheme could well be established on a much smaller area. On this would be created a pilot project for the growing of various green products. Typically the site  would be level, low-lying, and surrounded by open drainage ditches. The bottom of these drains would be full of stagnant water for much of the year, heavily polluted with nitrates, phosphates, pathogens like crypto spiridium and e-coli, and many other organic and chemical substances accumulated from the surrounding district. Heavy rain and flood conditions would periodically flush this poison into the larger watercourses and rivers.
     Within 3 years I would expect to start harvesting several commercial crops and up to 7 years would see the full development of several more. The total achievements from the site would be as follows:

Renewable fuel with negative carbon footprint.
Green construction materials.
Research and development of green buildings.
A science and technology centre.
A website for the sharing of knowledge, skills and ideas.
Tourism.
Skills and craft training and application.
Low energy farming and harvesting.
Natural energy processing and manufacturing.
Allotments and therapy gardens.
Visitor centre.
Wildlife centre.
Carbon-negative food production.
Waste treatment.
Purification of ground water and environment.
Centre for culture and heritage.

     The stagnant drains would be led into a small collection lake and from there would be circulated, ideally by wind pump, through a series of gravity-fed terraced reedbeds back to the lake.  This system would act as a flood buffer and would progressively cleanse the water through the reed roots. With the reduction of excessive fertilizers, reed quality would improve towards the final beds. The poorer quality reed would be utilised for fuel chaff or building insulation as in the prototype structure I have designed.

     Acid-tolerant reed and coppice would be at the centre of the system. Other crops would be on the border in more neutral soil. Short term produce would be thatching reed and renewable fuel from willow (investment return possibly within two years). Further fuel coppice could take between 3 to 7 years. Food crops could be from 2 years onwards up to 400 years depending on the crop. Reed will grow from the same roots every year, willow up to 7 years before becoming tired, but very easily propogated.

     Fuel crops are low level, low return, but commercially stable, and will become more so as the green impact bites globally. Research and development will take the quality end of the crop and turn it into high spec., valuable standardised building sections, totally green and sustainable, for the construction of prefabricated homes both for Ireland and for export. This will increase the value of the crop considerably. Modern scientific monitoring of the first prototype house will be carried out, to ascertain its durability and eco value, its thermal insulation properties, and its commercial viability. A similar scientific approach will be taken towards the cleansing of the environment and the benefits of the system for wildlife.

     Presently a considerable importation occurs annually of thatching reed and straw. This scheme would not only reduce imports but could produce exports. Reed and coppice timber has far greater potential than just thatching, and this should be explored.
 
     Training in traditional skills and agricultural methods would be central to the scheme, as would be the marriage of these green skills and materials with 21st century technology and design.

     The use of wind or water power would be employed for basic processing of fuel or wood pellets wherever possible.

     A storage and distribution centre would be established.

     The central system of water flow and drainage, once set up, could allow for sideways expansion of the plan, land space permitting, without the need for much further expense in the infrastructure, and the model, once proven, could be replicated any number of times throughout the country, but especially on otherwise-unproductive areas such as exhausted Bord na Mona turf bogs and boggy Coillte land. From quite small to very large areas would work, especially with the central collection and distribution warehouses to handle the national crop. Small farmers with areas of poor land could benefit greatly. Those research crops from the bordering fields which showed the best potential would be further developed either adjacently or on separate sites. The potential for wealth and jobs creation is vast, as is the environmental and ecological benefit from the scheme. Initial start-up costs would be very modest, and growth would be controllable. Each module would be small compared with the national scheme of the future, and as such the whole scheme would not fail due to one factor, such as rising fossil fuel costs. Massive single businesses, while financially very successful, are also prone to sudden catastrophic collapse. This scheme would start all from the same point, that is the growing of cellulosic materials, but would have sufficient diverse outlets to protect the system as a whole. 
  The plan I have devised is to take a small area of poor quality, saturated acid land, up to 20 acres, bordered by strips of better, less acid land up to a further 20 acres, although the scheme could well be established on a much smaller area. On this would be created a pilot project for the growing of various green products. Typically the site  would be level, low-lying, and surrounded by open drainage ditches. The bottom of these drains would be full of stagnant water for much of the year, heavily polluted with nitrates, phosphates, pathogens like crypto spiridium and e-coli, and many other organic and chemical substances accumulated from the surrounding district. Heavy rain and flood conditions would periodically flush this poison into the larger watercourses and rivers.
     Within 3 years I would expect to start harvesting several commercial crops and up to 7 years would see the full development of several more. The total achievements from the site would be as follows:

Renewable fuel with negative carbon footprint.
Green construction materials.
Research and development of green buildings.
A science and technology centre.
A website for the sharing of knowledge, skills and ideas.
Tourism.
Skills and craft training and application.
Low energy farming and harvesting.
Natural energy processing and manufacturing.
Allotments and therapy gardens.
Visitor centre.
Wildlife centre.
Carbon-negative food production.
Waste treatment.
Purification of ground water and environment.
Centre for culture and heritage.

     The stagnant drains would be led into a small collection lake and from there would be circulated, ideally by wind pump, through a series of gravity-fed terraced reedbeds back to the lake.  This system would act as a flood buffer and would progressively cleanse the water through the reed roots. With the reduction of excessive fertilizers, reed quality would improve towards the final beds. The poorer quality reed would be utilised for fuel chaff or building insulation as in the prototype structure I have designed.

     Acid-tolerant reed and coppice would be at the centre of the system. Other crops would be on the border in more neutral soil. Short term produce would be thatching reed and renewable fuel from willow (investment return possibly within two years). Further fuel coppice could take between 3 to 7 years. Food crops could be from 2 years onwards up to 400 years depending on the crop. Reed will grow from the same roots every year, willow up to 7 years before becoming tired, but very easily propogated.

     Fuel crops are low level, low return, but commercially stable, and will become more so as the green impact bites globally. Research and development will take the quality end of the crop and turn it into high spec., valuable standardised building sections, totally green and sustainable, for the construction of prefabricated homes both for Ireland and for export. This will increase the value of the crop considerably. Modern scientific monitoring of the first prototype house will be carried out, to ascertain its durability and eco value, its thermal insulation properties, and its commercial viability. A similar scientific approach will be taken towards the cleansing of the environment and the benefits of the system for wildlife.

     Presently a considerable importation occurs annually of thatching reed and straw. This scheme would not only reduce imports but could produce exports. Reed and coppice timber has far greater potential than just thatching, and this should be explored.
 
     Training in traditional skills and agricultural methods would be central to the scheme, as would be the marriage of these green skills and materials with 21st century technology and design.

     The use of wind or water power would be employed for basic processing of fuel or wood pellets wherever possible.

     A storage and distribution centre would be established.

     The central system of water flow and drainage, once set up, could allow for sideways expansion of the plan, land space permitting, without the need for much further expense in the infrastructure, and the model, once proven, could be replicated any number of times throughout the country, but especially on otherwise-unproductive areas such as exhausted Bord na Mona turf bogs and boggy Coillte land. From quite small to very large areas would work, especially with the central collection and distribution warehouses to handle the national crop. Small farmers with areas of poor land could benefit greatly. Those research crops from the bordering fields which showed the best potential would be further developed either adjacently or on separate sites. The potential for wealth and jobs creation is vast, as is the environmental and ecological benefit from the scheme. Initial start-up costs would be very modest, and growth would be controllable. Each module would be small compared with the national scheme of the future, and as such the whole scheme would not fail due to one factor, such as rising fossil fuel costs. Massive single businesses, while financially very successful, are also prone to sudden catastrophic collapse. This scheme would start all from the same point, that is the growing of cellulosic materials, but would have sufficient diverse outlets to protect the system as a whole. 
  The plan I have devised is to take a small area of poor quality, saturated acid land, up to 20 acres, bordered by strips of better, less acid land up to a further 20 acres, although the scheme could well be established on a much smaller area. On this would be created a pilot project for the growing of various green products. Typically the site  would be level, low-lying, and surrounded by open drainage ditches. The bottom of these drains would be full of stagnant water for much of the year, heavily polluted with nitrates, phosphates, pathogens like crypto spiridium and e-coli, and many other organic and chemical substances accumulated from the surrounding district. Heavy rain and flood conditions would periodically flush this poison into the larger watercourses and rivers.
     Within 3 years I would expect to start harvesting several commercial crops and up to 7 years would see the full development of several more. The total achievements from the site would be as follows:

Renewable fuel with negative carbon footprint.
Green construction materials.
Research and development of green buildings.
A science and technology centre.
A website for the sharing of knowledge, skills and ideas.
Tourism.
Skills and craft training and application.
Low energy farming and harvesting.
Natural energy processing and manufacturing.
Allotments and therapy gardens.
Visitor centre.
Wildlife centre.
Carbon-negative food production.
Waste treatment.
Purification of ground water and environment.
Centre for culture and heritage.

     The stagnant drains would be led into a small collection lake and from there would be circulated, ideally by wind pump, through a series of gravity-fed terraced reedbeds back to the lake.  This system would act as a flood buffer and would progressively cleanse the water through the reed roots. With the reduction of excessive fertilizers, reed quality would improve towards the final beds. The poorer quality reed would be utilised for fuel chaff or building insulation as in the prototype structure I have designed.

     Acid-tolerant reed and coppice would be at the centre of the system. Other crops would be on the border in more neutral soil. Short term produce would be thatching reed and renewable fuel from willow (investment return possibly within two years). Further fuel coppice could take between 3 to 7 years. Food crops could be from 2 years onwards up to 400 years depending on the crop. Reed will grow from the same roots every year, willow up to 7 years before becoming tired, but very easily propogated.

     Fuel crops are low level, low return, but commercially stable, and will become more so as the green impact bites globally. Research and development will take the quality end of the crop and turn it into high spec., valuable standardised building sections, totally green and sustainable, for the construction of prefabricated homes both for Ireland and for export. This will increase the value of the crop considerably. Modern scientific monitoring of the first prototype house will be carried out, to ascertain its durability and eco value, its thermal insulation properties, and its commercial viability. A similar scientific approach will be taken towards the cleansing of the environment and the benefits of the system for wildlife.

     Presently a considerable importation occurs annually of thatching reed and straw. This scheme would not only reduce imports but could produce exports. Reed and coppice timber has far greater potential than just thatching, and this should be explored.
 
     Training in traditional skills and agricultural methods would be central to the scheme, as would be the marriage of these green skills and materials with 21st century technology and design.

     The use of wind or water power would be employed for basic processing of fuel or wood pellets wherever possible.

     A storage and distribution centre would be established.

     The central system of water flow and drainage, once set up, could allow for sideways expansion of the plan, land space permitting, without the need for much further expense in the infrastructure, and the model, once proven, could be replicated any number of times throughout the country, but especially on otherwise-unproductive areas such as exhausted Bord na Mona turf bogs and boggy Coillte land. From quite small to very large areas would work, especially with the central collection and distribution warehouses to handle the national crop. Small farmers with areas of poor land could benefit greatly. Those research crops from the bordering fields which showed the best potential would be further developed either adjacently or on separate sites. The potential for wealth and jobs creation is vast, as is the environmental and ecological benefit from the scheme. Initial start-up costs would be very modest, and growth would be controllable. Each module would be small compared with the national scheme of the future, and as such the whole scheme would not fail due to one factor, such as rising fossil fuel costs. Massive single businesses, while financially very successful, are also prone to sudden catastrophic collapse. This scheme would start all from the same point, that is the growing of cellulosic materials, but would have sufficient diverse outlets to protect the system as a whole. 
  The plan I have devised is to take a small area of poor quality, saturated acid land, up to 20 acres, bordered by strips of better, less acid land up to a further 20 acres, although the scheme could well be established on a much smaller area. On this would be created a pilot project for the growing of various green products. Typically the site  would be level, low-lying, and surrounded by open drainage ditches. The bottom of these drains would be full of stagnant water for much of the year, heavily polluted with nitrates, phosphates, pathogens like crypto spiridium and e-coli, and many other organic and chemical substances accumulated from the surrounding district. Heavy rain and flood conditions would periodically flush this poison into the larger watercourses and rivers.
     Within 3 years I would expect to start harvesting several commercial crops and up to 7 years would see the full development of several more. The total achievements from the site would be as follows:

Renewable fuel with negative carbon footprint.
Green construction materials.
Research and development of green buildings.
A science and technology centre.
A website for the sharing of knowledge, skills and ideas.
Tourism.
Skills and craft training and application.
Low energy farming and harvesting.
Natural energy processing and manufacturing.
Allotments and therapy gardens.
Visitor centre.
Wildlife centre.
Carbon-negative food production.
Waste treatment.
Purification of ground water and environment.
Centre for culture and heritage.

     The stagnant drains would be led into a small collection lake and from there would be circulated, ideally by wind pump, through a series of gravity-fed terraced reedbeds back to the lake.  This system would act as a flood buffer and would progressively cleanse the water through the reed roots. With the reduction of excessive fertilizers, reed quality would improve towards the final beds. The poorer quality reed would be utilised for fuel chaff or building insulation as in the prototype structure I have designed.

     Acid-tolerant reed and coppice would be at the centre of the system. Other crops would be on the border in more neutral soil. Short term produce would be thatching reed and renewable fuel from willow (investment return possibly within two years). Further fuel coppice could take between 3 to 7 years. Food crops could be from 2 years onwards up to 400 years depending on the crop. Reed will grow from the same roots every year, willow up to 7 years before becoming tired, but very easily propogated.

     Fuel crops are low level, low return, but commercially stable, and will become more so as the green impact bites globally. Research and development will take the quality end of the crop and turn it into high spec., valuable standardised building sections, totally green and sustainable, for the construction of prefabricated homes both for Ireland and for export. This will increase the value of the crop considerably. Modern scientific monitoring of the first prototype house will be carried out, to ascertain its durability and eco value, its thermal insulation properties, and its commercial viability. A similar scientific approach will be taken towards the cleansing of the environment and the benefits of the system for wildlife.

     Presently a considerable importation occurs annually of thatching reed and straw. This scheme would not only reduce imports but could produce exports. Reed and coppice timber has far greater potential than just thatching, and this should be explored.
 
     Training in traditional skills and agricultural methods would be central to the scheme, as would be the marriage of these green skills and materials with 21st century technology and design.

     The use of wind or water power would be employed for basic processing of fuel or wood pellets wherever possible.

     A storage and distribution centre would be established.

     The central system of water flow and drainage, once set up, could allow for sideways expansion of the plan, land space permitting, without the need for much further expense in the infrastructure, and the model, once proven, could be replicated any number of times throughout the country, but especially on otherwise-unproductive areas such as exhausted Bord na Mona turf bogs and boggy Coillte land. From quite small to very large areas would work, especially with the central collection and distribution warehouses to handle the national crop. Small farmers with areas of poor land could benefit greatly. Those research crops from the bordering fields which showed the best potential would be further developed either adjacently or on separate sites. The potential for wealth and jobs creation is vast, as is the environmental and ecological benefit from the scheme. Initial start-up costs would be very modest, and growth would be controllable. Each module would be small compared with the national scheme of the future, and as such the whole scheme would not fail due to one factor, such as rising fossil fuel costs. Massive single businesses, while financially very successful, are also prone to sudden catastrophic collapse. This scheme would start all from the same point, that is the growing of cellulosic materials, but would have sufficient diverse outlets to protect the system as a whole. 
  The plan I have devised is to take a small area of poor quality, saturated acid land, up to 20 acres, bordered by strips of better, less acid land up to a further 20 acres, although the scheme could well be established on a much smaller area. On this would be created a pilot project for the growing of various green products. Typically the site  would be level, low-lying, and surrounded by open drainage ditches. The bottom of these drains would be full of stagnant water for much of the year, heavily polluted with nitrates, phosphates, pathogens like crypto spiridium and e-coli, and many other organic and chemical substances accumulated from the surrounding district. Heavy rain and flood conditions would periodically flush this poison into the larger watercourses and rivers.
     Within 3 years I would expect to start harvesting several commercial crops and up to 7 years would see the full development of several more. The total achievements from the site would be as follows:

Renewable fuel with negative carbon footprint.
Green construction materials.
Research and development of green buildings.
A science and technology centre.
A website for the sharing of knowledge, skills and ideas.
Tourism.
Skills and craft training and application.
Low energy farming and harvesting.
Natural energy processing and manufacturing.
Allotments and therapy gardens.
Visitor centre.
Wildlife centre.
Carbon-negative food production.
Waste treatment.
Purification of ground water and environment.
Centre for culture and heritage.

     The stagnant drains would be led into a small collection lake and from there would be circulated, ideally by wind pump, through a series of gravity-fed terraced reedbeds back to the lake.  This system would act as a flood buffer and would progressively cleanse the water through the reed roots. With the reduction of excessive fertilizers, reed quality would improve towards the final beds. The poorer quality reed would be utilised for fuel chaff or building insulation as in the prototype structure I have designed.

     Acid-tolerant reed and coppice would be at the centre of the system. Other crops would be on the border in more neutral soil. Short term produce would be thatching reed and renewable fuel from willow (investment return possibly within two years). Further fuel coppice could take between 3 to 7 years. Food crops could be from 2 years onwards up to 400 years depending on the crop. Reed will grow from the same roots every year, willow up to 7 years before becoming tired, but very easily propogated.

     Fuel crops are low level, low return, but commercially stable, and will become more so as the green impact bites globally. Research and development will take the quality end of the crop and turn it into high spec., valuable standardised building sections, totally green and sustainable, for the construction of prefabricated homes both for Ireland and for export. This will increase the value of the crop considerably. Modern scientific monitoring of the first prototype house will be carried out, to ascertain its durability and eco value, its thermal insulation properties, and its commercial viability. A similar scientific approach will be taken towards the cleansing of the environment and the benefits of the system for wildlife.

     Presently a considerable importation occurs annually of thatching reed and straw. This scheme would not only reduce imports but could produce exports. Reed and coppice timber has far greater potential than just thatching, and this should be explored.
 
     Training in traditional skills and agricultural methods would be central to the scheme, as would be the marriage of these green skills and materials with 21st century technology and design.

     The use of wind or water power would be employed for basic processing of fuel or wood pellets wherever possible.

     A storage and distribution centre would be established.

     The central system of water flow and drainage, once set up, could allow for sideways expansion of the plan, land space permitting, without the need for much further expense in the infrastructure, and the model, once proven, could be replicated any number of times throughout the country, but especially on otherwise-unproductive areas such as exhausted Bord na Mona turf bogs and boggy Coillte land. From quite small to very large areas would work, especially with the central collection and distribution warehouses to handle the national crop. Small farmers with areas of poor land could benefit greatly. Those research crops from the bordering fields which showed the best potential would be further developed either adjacently or on separate sites. The potential for wealth and jobs creation is vast, as is the environmental and ecological benefit from the scheme. Initial start-up costs would be very modest, and growth would be controllable. Each module would be small compared with the national scheme of the future, and as such the whole scheme would not fail due to one factor, such as rising fossil fuel costs. Massive single businesses, while financially very successful, are also prone to sudden catastrophic collapse. This scheme would start all from the same point, that is the growing of cellulosic materials, but would have sufficient diverse outlets to protect the system as a whole. 
  The plan I have devised is to take a small area of poor quality, saturated acid land, up to 20 acres, bordered by strips of better, less acid land up to a further 20 acres, although the scheme could well be established on a much smaller area. On this would be created a pilot project for the growing of various green products. Typically the site  would be level, low-lying, and surrounded by open drainage ditches. The bottom of these drains would be full of stagnant water for much of the year, heavily polluted with nitrates, phosphates, pathogens like crypto spiridium and e-coli, and many other organic and chemical substances accumulated from the surrounding district. Heavy rain and flood conditions would periodically flush this poison into the larger watercourses and rivers.
     Within 3 years I would expect to start harvesting several commercial crops and up to 7 years would see the full development of several more. The total achievements from the site would be as follows:

Renewable fuel with negative carbon footprint.
Green construction materials.
Research and development of green buildings.
A science and technology centre.
A website for the sharing of knowledge, skills and ideas.
Tourism.
Skills and craft training and application.
Low energy farming and harvesting.
Natural energy processing and manufacturing.
Allotments and therapy gardens.
Visitor centre.
Wildlife centre.
Carbon-negative food production.
Waste treatment.
Purification of ground water and environment.
Centre for culture and heritage.

     The stagnant drains would be led into a small collection lake and from there would be circulated, ideally by wind pump, through a series of gravity-fed terraced reedbeds back to the lake.  This system would act as a flood buffer and would progressively cleanse the water through the reed roots. With the reduction of excessive fertilizers, reed quality would improve towards the final beds. The poorer quality reed would be utilised for fuel chaff or building insulation as in the prototype structure I have designed.

     Acid-tolerant reed and coppice would be at the centre of the system. Other crops would be on the border in more neutral soil. Short term produce would be thatching reed and renewable fuel from willow (investment return possibly within two years). Further fuel coppice could take between 3 to 7 years. Food crops could be from 2 years onwards up to 400 years depending on the crop. Reed will grow from the same roots every year, willow up to 7 years before becoming tired, but very easily propogated.

     Fuel crops are low level, low return, but commercially stable, and will become more so as the green impact bites globally. Research and development will take the quality end of the crop and turn it into high spec., valuable standardised building sections, totally green and sustainable, for the construction of prefabricated homes both for Ireland and for export. This will increase the value of the crop considerably. Modern scientific monitoring of the first prototype house will be carried out, to ascertain its durability and eco value, its thermal insulation properties, and its commercial viability. A similar scientific approach will be taken towards the cleansing of the environment and the benefits of the system for wildlife.

     Presently a considerable importation occurs annually of thatching reed and straw. This scheme would not only reduce imports but could produce exports. Reed and coppice timber has far greater potential than just thatching, and this should be explored.
 
     Training in traditional skills and agricultural methods would be central to the scheme, as would be the marriage of these green skills and materials with 21st century technology and design.

     The use of wind or water power would be employed for basic processing of fuel or wood pellets wherever possible.

     A storage and distribution centre would be established.

     The central system of water flow and drainage, once set up, could allow for sideways expansion of the plan, land space permitting, without the need for much further expense in the infrastructure, and the model, once proven, could be replicated any number of times throughout the country, but especially on otherwise-unproductive areas such as exhausted Bord na Mona turf bogs and boggy Coillte land. From quite small to very large areas would work, especially with the central collection and distribution warehouses to handle the national crop. Small farmers with areas of poor land could benefit greatly. Those research crops from the bordering fields which showed the best potential would be further developed either adjacently or on separate sites. The potential for wealth and jobs creation is vast, as is the environmental and ecological benefit from the scheme. Initial start-up costs would be very modest, and growth would be controllable. Each module would be small compared with the national scheme of the future, and as such the whole scheme would not fail due to one factor, such as rising fossil fuel costs. Massive single businesses, while financially very successful, are also prone to sudden catastrophic collapse. This scheme would start all from the same point, that is the growing of cellulosic materials, but would have sufficient diverse outlets to protect the system as a whole. 
  The plan I have devised is to take a small area of poor quality, saturated acid land, up to 20 acres, bordered by strips of better, less acid land up to a further 20 acres, although the scheme could well be established on a much smaller area. On this would be created a pilot project for the growing of various green products. Typically the site  would be level, low-lying, and surrounded by open drainage ditches. The bottom of these drains would be full of stagnant water for much of the year, heavily polluted with nitrates, phosphates, pathogens like crypto spiridium and e-coli, and many other organic and chemical substances accumulated from the surrounding district. Heavy rain and flood conditions would periodically flush this poison into the larger watercourses and rivers.
     Within 3 years I would expect to start harvesting several commercial crops and up to 7 years would see the full development of several more. The total achievements from the site would be as follows:

Renewable fuel with negative carbon footprint.
Green construction materials.
Research and development of green buildings.
A science and technology centre.
A website for the sharing of knowledge, skills and ideas.
Tourism.
Skills and craft training and application.
Low energy farming and harvesting.
Natural energy processing and manufacturing.
Allotments and therapy gardens.
Visitor centre.
Wildlife centre.
Carbon-negative food production.
Waste treatment.
Purification of ground water and environment.
Centre for culture and heritage.

     The stagnant drains would be led into a small collection lake and from there would be circulated, ideally by wind pump, through a series of gravity-fed terraced reedbeds back to the lake.  This system would act as a flood buffer and would progressively cleanse the water through the reed roots. With the reduction of excessive fertilizers, reed quality would improve towards the final beds. The poorer quality reed would be utilised for fuel chaff or building insulation as in the prototype structure I have designed.

     Acid-tolerant reed and coppice would be at the centre of the system. Other crops would be on the border in more neutral soil. Short term produce would be thatching reed and renewable fuel from willow (investment return possibly within two years). Further fuel coppice could take between 3 to 7 years. Food crops could be from 2 years onwards up to 400 years depending on the crop. Reed will grow from the same roots every year, willow up to 7 years before becoming tired, but very easily propogated.

     Fuel crops are low level, low return, but commercially stable, and will become more so as the green impact bites globally. Research and development will take the quality end of the crop and turn it into high spec., valuable standardised building sections, totally green and sustainable, for the construction of prefabricated homes both for Ireland and for export. This will increase the value of the crop considerably. Modern scientific monitoring of the first prototype house will be carried out, to ascertain its durability and eco value, its thermal insulation properties, and its commercial viability. A similar scientific approach will be taken towards the cleansing of the environment and the benefits of the system for wildlife.

     Presently a considerable importation occurs annually of thatching reed and straw. This scheme would not only reduce imports but could produce exports. Reed and coppice timber has far greater potential than just thatching, and this should be explored.
 
     Training in traditional skills and agricultural methods would be central to the scheme, as would be the marriage of these green skills and materials with 21st century technology and design.

     The use of wind or water power would be employed for basic processing of fuel or wood pellets wherever possible.

     A storage and distribution centre would be established.

     The central system of water flow and drainage, once set up, could allow for sideways expansion of the plan, land space permitting, without the need for much further expense in the infrastructure, and the model, once proven, could be replicated any number of times throughout the country, but especially on otherwise-unproductive areas such as exhausted Bord na Mona turf bogs and boggy Coillte land. From quite small to very large areas would work, especially with the central collection and distribution warehouses to handle the national crop. Small farmers with areas of poor land could benefit greatly. Those research crops from the bordering fields which showed the best potential would be further developed either adjacently or on separate sites. The potential for wealth and jobs creation is vast, as is the environmental and ecological benefit from the scheme. Initial start-up costs would be very modest, and growth would be controllable. Each module would be small compared with the national scheme of the future, and as such the whole scheme would not fail due to one factor, such as rising fossil fuel costs. Massive single businesses, while financially very successful, are also prone to sudden catastrophic collapse. This scheme would start all from the same point, that is the growing of cellulosic materials, but would have sufficient diverse outlets to protect the system as a whole. 
  The plan I have devised is to take a small area of poor quality, saturated acid land, up to 20 acres, bordered by strips of better, less acid land up to a further 20 acres, although the scheme could well be established on a much smaller area. On this would be created a pilot project for the growing of various green products. Typically the site  would be level, low-lying, and surrounded by open drainage ditches. The bottom of these drains would be full of stagnant water for much of the year, heavily polluted with nitrates, phosphates, pathogens like crypto spiridium and e-coli, and many other organic and chemical substances accumulated from the surrounding district. Heavy rain and flood conditions would periodically flush this poison into the larger watercourses and rivers.
     Within 3 years I would expect to start harvesting several commercial crops and up to 7 years would see the full development of several more. The total achievements from the site would be as follows:

Renewable fuel with negative carbon footprint.
Green construction materials.
Research and development of green buildings.
A science and technology centre.
A website for the sharing of knowledge, skills and ideas.
Tourism.
Skills and craft training and application.
Low energy farming and harvesting.
Natural energy processing and manufacturing.
Allotments and therapy gardens.
Visitor centre.
Wildlife centre.
Carbon-negative food production.
Waste treatment.
Purification of ground water and environment.
Centre for culture and heritage.

     The stagnant drains would be led into a small collection lake and from there would be circulated, ideally by wind pump, through a series of gravity-fed terraced reedbeds back to the lake.  This system would act as a flood buffer and would progressively cleanse the water through the reed roots. With the reduction of excessive fertilizers, reed quality would improve towards the final beds. The poorer quality reed would be utilised for fuel chaff or building insulation as in the prototype structure I have designed.

     Acid-tolerant reed and coppice would be at the centre of the system. Other crops would be on the border in more neutral soil. Short term produce would be thatching reed and renewable fuel from willow (investment return possibly within two years). Further fuel coppice could take between 3 to 7 years. Food crops could be from 2 years onwards up to 400 years depending on the crop. Reed will grow from the same roots every year, willow up to 7 years before becoming tired, but very easily propogated.

     Fuel crops are low level, low return, but commercially stable, and will become more so as the green impact bites globally. Research and development will take the quality end of the crop and turn it into high spec., valuable standardised building sections, totally green and sustainable, for the construction of prefabricated homes both for Ireland and for export. This will increase the value of the crop considerably. Modern scientific monitoring of the first prototype house will be carried out, to ascertain its durability and eco value, its thermal insulation properties, and its commercial viability. A similar scientific approach will be taken towards the cleansing of the environment and the benefits of the system for wildlife.

     Presently a considerable importation occurs annually of thatching reed and straw. This scheme would not only reduce imports but could produce exports. Reed and coppice timber has far greater potential than just thatching, and this should be explored.
 
     Training in traditional skills and agricultural methods would be central to the scheme, as would be the marriage of these green skills and materials with 21st century technology and design.

     The use of wind or water power would be employed for basic processing of fuel or wood pellets wherever possible.

     A storage and distribution centre would be established.

     The central system of water flow and drainage, once set up, could allow for sideways expansion of the plan, land space permitting, without the need for much further expense in the infrastructure, and the model, once proven, could be replicated any number of times throughout the country, but especially on otherwise-unproductive areas such as exhausted Bord na Mona turf bogs and boggy Coillte land. From quite small to very large areas would work, especially with the central collection and distribution warehouses to handle the national crop. Small farmers with areas of poor land could benefit greatly. Those research crops from the bordering fields which showed the best potential would be further developed either adjacently or on separate sites. The potential for wealth and jobs creation is vast, as is the environmental and ecological benefit from the scheme. Initial start-up costs would be very modest, and growth would be controllable. Each module would be small compared with the national scheme of the future, and as such the whole scheme would not fail due to one factor, such as rising fossil fuel costs. Massive single businesses, while financially very successful, are also prone to sudden catastrophic collapse. This scheme would start all from the same point, that is the growing of cellulosic materials, but would have sufficient diverse outlets to protect the system as a whole. 
  The plan I have devised is to take a small area of poor quality, saturated acid land, up to 20 acres, bordered by strips of better, less acid land up to a further 20 acres, although the scheme could well be established on a much smaller area. On this would be created a pilot project for the growing of various green products. Typically the site  would be level, low-lying, and surrounded by open drainage ditches. The bottom of these drains would be full of stagnant water for much of the year, heavily polluted with nitrates, phosphates, pathogens like crypto spiridium and e-coli, and many other organic and chemical substances accumulated from the surrounding district. Heavy rain and flood conditions would periodically flush this poison into the larger watercourses and rivers.
     Within 3 years I would expect to start harvesting several commercial crops and up to 7 years would see the full development of several more. The total achievements from the site would be as follows:

Renewable fuel with negative carbon footprint.
Green construction materials.
Research and development of green buildings.
A science and technology centre.
A website for the sharing of knowledge, skills and ideas.
Tourism.
Skills and craft training and application.
Low energy farming and harvesting.
Natural energy processing and manufacturing.
Allotments and therapy gardens.
Visitor centre.
Wildlife centre.
Carbon-negative food production.
Waste treatment.
Purification of ground water and environment.
Centre for culture and heritage.

     The stagnant drains would be led into a small collection lake and from there would be circulated, ideally by wind pump, through a series of gravity-fed terraced reedbeds back to the lake.  This system would act as a flood buffer and would progressively cleanse the water through the reed roots. With the reduction of excessive fertilizers, reed quality would improve towards the final beds. The poorer quality reed would be utilised for fuel chaff or building insulation as in the prototype structure I have designed.

     Acid-tolerant reed and coppice would be at the centre of the system. Other crops would be on the border in more neutral soil. Short term produce would be thatching reed and renewable fuel from willow (investment return possibly within two years). Further fuel coppice could take between 3 to 7 years. Food crops could be from 2 years onwards up to 400 years depending on the crop. Reed will grow from the same roots every year, willow up to 7 years before becoming tired, but very easily propogated.

     Fuel crops are low level, low return, but commercially stable, and will become more so as the green impact bites globally. Research and development will take the quality end of the crop and turn it into high spec., valuable standardised building sections, totally green and sustainable, for the construction of prefabricated homes both for Ireland and for export. This will increase the value of the crop considerably. Modern scientific monitoring of the first prototype house will be carried out, to ascertain its durability and eco value, its thermal insulation properties, and its commercial viability. A similar scientific approach will be taken towards the cleansing of the environment and the benefits of the system for wildlife.

     Presently a considerable importation occurs annually of thatching reed and straw. This scheme would not only reduce imports but could produce exports. Reed and coppice timber has far greater potential than just thatching, and this should be explored.
 
     Training in traditional skills and agricultural methods would be central to the scheme, as would be the marriage of these green skills and materials with 21st century technology and design.

     The use of wind or water power would be employed for basic processing of fuel or wood pellets wherever possible.

     A storage and distribution centre would be established.

     The central system of water flow and drainage, once set up, could allow for sideways expansion of the plan, land space permitting, without the need for much further expense in the infrastructure, and the model, once proven, could be replicated any number of times throughout the country, but especially on otherwise-unproductive areas such as exhausted Bord na Mona turf bogs and boggy Coillte land. From quite small to very large areas would work, especially with the central collection and distribution warehouses to handle the national crop. Small farmers with areas of poor land could benefit greatly. Those research crops from the bordering fields which showed the best potential would be further developed either adjacently or on separate sites. The potential for wealth and jobs creation is vast, as is the environmental and ecological benefit from the scheme. Initial start-up costs would be very modest, and growth would be controllable. Each module would be small compared with the national scheme of the future, and as such the whole scheme would not fail due to one factor, such as rising fossil fuel costs. Massive single businesses, while financially very successful, are also prone to sudden catastrophic collapse. This scheme would start all from the same point, that is the growing of cellulosic materials, but would have sufficient diverse outlets to protect the system as a whole. 
  The plan I have devised is to take a small area of poor quality, saturated acid land, up to 20 acres, bordered by strips of better, less acid land up to a further 20 acres, although the scheme could well be established on a much smaller area. On this would be created a pilot project for the growing of various green products. Typically the site  would be level, low-lying, and surrounded by open drainage ditches. The bottom of these drains would be full of stagnant water for much of the year, heavily polluted with nitrates, phosphates, pathogens like crypto spiridium and e-coli, and many other organic and chemical substances accumulated from the surrounding district. Heavy rain and flood conditions would periodically flush this poison into the larger watercourses and rivers.
     Within 3 years I would expect to start harvesting several commercial crops and up to 7 years would see the full development of several more. The total achievements from the site would be as follows:

Renewable fuel with negative carbon footprint.
Green construction materials.
Research and development of green buildings.
A science and technology centre.
A website for the sharing of knowledge, skills and ideas.
Tourism.
Skills and craft training and application.
Low energy farming and harvesting.
Natural energy processing and manufacturing.
Allotments and therapy gardens.
Visitor centre.
Wildlife centre.
Carbon-negative food production.
Waste treatment.
Purification of ground water and environment.
Centre for culture and heritage.

     The stagnant drains would be led into a small collection lake and from there would be circulated, ideally by wind pump, through a series of gravity-fed terraced reedbeds back to the lake.  This system would act as a flood buffer and would progressively cleanse the water through the reed roots. With the reduction of excessive fertilizers, reed quality would improve towards the final beds. The poorer quality reed would be utilised for fuel chaff or building insulation as in the prototype structure I have designed.

     Acid-tolerant reed and coppice would be at the centre of the system. Other crops would be on the border in more neutral soil. Short term produce would be thatching reed and renewable fuel from willow (investment return possibly within two years). Further fuel coppice could take between 3 to 7 years. Food crops could be from 2 years onwards up to 400 years depending on the crop. Reed will grow from the same roots every year, willow up to 7 years before becoming tired, but very easily propogated.

     Fuel crops are low level, low return, but commercially stable, and will become more so as the green impact bites globally. Research and development will take the quality end of the crop and turn it into high spec., valuable standardised building sections, totally green and sustainable, for the construction of prefabricated homes both for Ireland and for export. This will increase the value of the crop considerably. Modern scientific monitoring of the first prototype house will be carried out, to ascertain its durability and eco value, its thermal insulation properties, and its commercial viability. A similar scientific approach will be taken towards the cleansing of the environment and the benefits of the system for wildlife.

     Presently a considerable importation occurs annually of thatching reed and straw. This scheme would not only reduce imports but could produce exports. Reed and coppice timber has far greater potential than just thatching, and this should be explored.
 
     Training in traditional skills and agricultural methods would be central to the scheme, as would be the marriage of these green skills and materials with 21st century technology and design.

     The use of wind or water power would be employed for basic processing of fuel or wood pellets wherever possible.

     A storage and distribution centre would be established.

     The central system of water flow and drainage, once set up, could allow for sideways expansion of the plan, land space permitting, without the need for much further expense in the infrastructure, and the model, once proven, could be replicated any number of times throughout the country, but especially on otherwise-unproductive areas such as exhausted Bord na Mona turf bogs and boggy Coillte land. From quite small to very large areas would work, especially with the central collection and distribution warehouses to handle the national crop. Small farmers with areas of poor land could benefit greatly. Those research crops from the bordering fields which showed the best potential would be further developed either adjacently or on separate sites. The potential for wealth and jobs creation is vast, as is the environmental and ecological benefit from the scheme. Initial start-up costs would be very modest, and growth would be controllable. Each module would be small compared with the national scheme of the future, and as such the whole scheme would not fail due to one factor, such as rising fossil fuel costs. Massive single businesses, while financially very successful, are also prone to sudden catastrophic collapse. This scheme would start all from the same point, that is the growing of cellulosic materials, but would have sufficient diverse outlets to protect the system as a whole. 
  The plan I have devised is to take a small area of poor quality, saturated acid land, up to 20 acres, bordered by strips of better, less acid land up to a further 20 acres, although the scheme could well be established on a much smaller area. On this would be created a pilot project for the growing of various green products. Typically the site  would be level, low-lying, and surrounded by open drainage ditches. The bottom of these drains would be full of stagnant water for much of the year, heavily polluted with nitrates, phosphates, pathogens like crypto spiridium and e-coli, and many other organic and chemical substances accumulated from the surrounding district. Heavy rain and flood conditions would periodically flush this poison into the larger watercourses and rivers.
     Within 3 years I would expect to start harvesting several commercial crops and up to 7 years would see the full development of several more. The total achievements from the site would be as follows:

Renewable fuel with negative carbon footprint.
Green construction materials.
Research and development of green buildings.
A science and technology centre.
A website for the sharing of knowledge, skills and ideas.
Tourism.
Skills and craft training and application.
Low energy farming and harvesting.
Natural energy processing and manufacturing.
Allotments and therapy gardens.
Visitor centre.
Wildlife centre.
Carbon-negative food production.
Waste treatment.
Purification of ground water and environment.
Centre for culture and heritage.

     The stagnant drains would be led into a small collection lake and from there would be circulated, ideally by wind pump, through a series of gravity-fed terraced reedbeds back to the lake.  This system would act as a flood buffer and would progressively cleanse the water through the reed roots. With the reduction of excessive fertilizers, reed quality would improve towards the final beds. The poorer quality reed would be utilised for fuel chaff or building insulation as in the prototype structure I have designed.

     Acid-tolerant reed and coppice would be at the centre of the system. Other crops would be on the border in more neutral soil. Short term produce would be thatching reed and renewable fuel from willow (investment return possibly within two years). Further fuel coppice could take between 3 to 7 years. Food crops could be from 2 years onwards up to 400 years depending on the crop. Reed will grow from the same roots every year, willow up to 7 years before becoming tired, but very easily propogated.

     Fuel crops are low level, low return, but commercially stable, and will become more so as the green impact bites globally. Research and development will take the quality end of the crop and turn it into high spec., valuable standardised building sections, totally green and sustainable, for the construction of prefabricated homes both for Ireland and for export. This will increase the value of the crop considerably. Modern scientific monitoring of the first prototype house will be carried out, to ascertain its durability and eco value, its thermal insulation properties, and its commercial viability. A similar scientific approach will be taken towards the cleansing of the environment and the benefits of the system for wildlife.

     Presently a considerable importation occurs annually of thatching reed and straw. This scheme would not only reduce imports but could produce exports. Reed and coppice timber has far greater potential than just thatching, and this should be explored.
 
     Training in traditional skills and agricultural methods would be central to the scheme, as would be the marriage of these green skills and materials with 21st century technology and design.

     The use of wind or water power would be employed for basic processing of fuel or wood pellets wherever possible.

     A storage and distribution centre would be established.

     The central system of water flow and drainage, once set up, could allow for sideways expansion of the plan, land space permitting, without the need for much further expense in the infrastructure, and the model, once proven, could be replicated any number of times throughout the country, but especially on otherwise-unproductive areas such as exhausted Bord na Mona turf bogs and boggy Coillte land. From quite small to very large areas would work, especially with the central collection and distribution warehouses to handle the national crop. Small farmers with areas of poor land could benefit greatly. Those research crops from the bordering fields which showed the best potential would be further developed either adjacently or on separate sites. The potential for wealth and jobs creation is vast, as is the environmental and ecological benefit from the scheme. Initial start-up costs would be very modest, and growth would be controllable. Each module would be small compared with the national scheme of the future, and as such the whole scheme would not fail due to one factor, such as rising fossil fuel costs. Massive single businesses, while financially very successful, are also prone to sudden catastrophic collapse. This scheme would start all from the same point, that is the growing of cellulosic materials, but would have sufficient diverse outlets to protect the system as a whole. 
  The plan I have devised is to take a small area of poor quality, saturated acid land, up to 20 acres, bordered by strips of better, less acid land up to a further 20 acres, although the scheme could well be established on a much smaller area. On this would be created a pilot project for the growing of various green products. Typically the site  would be level, low-lying, and surrounded by open drainage ditches. The bottom of these drains would be full of stagnant water for much of the year, heavily polluted with nitrates, phosphates, pathogens like crypto spiridium and e-coli, and many other organic and chemical substances accumulated from the surrounding district. Heavy rain and flood conditions would periodically flush this poison into the larger watercourses and rivers.
     Within 3 years I would expect to start harvesting several commercial crops and up to 7 years would see the full development of several more. The total achievements from the site would be as follows:

Renewable fuel with negative carbon footprint.
Green construction materials.
Research and development of green buildings.
A science and technology centre.
A website for the sharing of knowledge, skills and ideas.
Tourism.
Skills and craft training and application.
Low energy farming and harvesting.
Natural energy processing and manufacturing.
Allotments and therapy gardens.
Visitor centre.
Wildlife centre.
Carbon-negative food production.
Waste treatment.
Purification of ground water and environment.
Centre for culture and heritage.

     The stagnant drains would be led into a small collection lake and from there would be circulated, ideally by wind pump, through a series of gravity-fed terraced reedbeds back to the lake.  This system would act as a flood buffer and would progressively cleanse the water through the reed roots. With the reduction of excessive fertilizers, reed quality would improve towards the final beds. The poorer quality reed would be utilised for fuel chaff or building insulation as in the prototype structure I have designed.

     Acid-tolerant reed and coppice would be at the centre of the system. Other crops would be on the border in more neutral soil. Short term produce would be thatching reed and renewable fuel from willow (investment return possibly within two years). Further fuel coppice could take between 3 to 7 years. Food crops could be from 2 years onwards up to 400 years depending on the crop. Reed will grow from the same roots every year, willow up to 7 years before becoming tired, but very easily propogated.

     Fuel crops are low level, low return, but commercially stable, and will become more so as the green impact bites globally. Research and development will take the quality end of the crop and turn it into high spec., valuable standardised building sections, totally green and sustainable, for the construction of prefabricated homes both for Ireland and for export. This will increase the value of the crop considerably. Modern scientific monitoring of the first prototype house will be carried out, to ascertain its durability and eco value, its thermal insulation properties, and its commercial viability. A similar scientific approach will be taken towards the cleansing of the environment and the benefits of the system for wildlife.

     Presently a considerable importation occurs annually of thatching reed and straw. This scheme would not only reduce imports but could produce exports. Reed and coppice timber has far greater potential than just thatching, and this should be explored.
 
     Training in traditional skills and agricultural methods would be central to the scheme, as would be the marriage of these green skills and materials with 21st century technology and design.

     The use of wind or water power would be employed for basic processing of fuel or wood pellets wherever possible.

     A storage and distribution centre would be established.

     The central system of water flow and drainage, once set up, could allow for sideways expansion of the plan, land space permitting, without the need for much further expense in the infrastructure, and the model, once proven, could be replicated any number of times throughout the country, but especially on otherwise-unproductive areas such as exhausted Bord na Mona turf bogs and boggy Coillte land. From quite small to very large areas would work, especially with the central collection and distribution warehouses to handle the national crop. Small farmers with areas of poor land could benefit greatly. Those research crops from the bordering fields which showed the best potential would be further developed either adjacently or on separate sites. The potential for wealth and jobs creation is vast, as is the environmental and ecological benefit from the scheme. Initial start-up costs would be very modest, and growth would be controllable. Each module would be small compared with the national scheme of the future, and as such the whole scheme would not fail due to one factor, such as rising fossil fuel costs. Massive single businesses, while financially very successful, are also prone to sudden catastrophic collapse. This scheme would start all from the same point, that is the growing of cellulosic materials, but would have sufficient diverse outlets to protect the system as a whole. 
  The plan I have devised is to take a small area of poor quality, saturated acid land, up to 20 acres, bordered by strips of better, less acid land up to a further 20 acres, although the scheme could well be established on a much smaller area. On this would be created a pilot project for the growing of various green products. Typically the site  would be level, low-lying, and surrounded by open drainage ditches. The bottom of these drains would be full of stagnant water for much of the year, heavily polluted with nitrates, phosphates, pathogens like crypto spiridium and e-coli, and many other organic and chemical substances accumulated from the surrounding district. Heavy rain and flood conditions would periodically flush this poison into the larger watercourses and rivers.
     Within 3 years I would expect to start harvesting several commercial crops and up to 7 years would see the full development of several more. The total achievements from the site would be as follows:

Renewable fuel with negative carbon footprint.
Green construction materials.
Research and development of green buildings.
A science and technology centre.
A website for the sharing of knowledge, skills and ideas.
Tourism.
Skills and craft training and application.
Low energy farming and harvesting.
Natural energy processing and manufacturing.
Allotments and therapy gardens.
Visitor centre.
Wildlife centre.
Carbon-negative food production.
Waste treatment.
Purification of ground water and environment.
Centre for culture and heritage.

     The stagnant drains would be led into a small collection lake and from there would be circulated, ideally by wind pump, through a series of gravity-fed terraced reedbeds back to the lake.  This system would act as a flood buffer and would progressively cleanse the water through the reed roots. With the reduction of excessive fertilizers, reed quality would improve towards the final beds. The poorer quality reed would be utilised for fuel chaff or building insulation as in the prototype structure I have designed.

     Acid-tolerant reed and coppice would be at the centre of the system. Other crops would be on the border in more neutral soil. Short term produce would be thatching reed and renewable fuel from willow (investment return possibly within two years). Further fuel coppice could take between 3 to 7 years. Food crops could be from 2 years onwards up to 400 years depending on the crop. Reed will grow from the same roots every year, willow up to 7 years before becoming tired, but very easily propogated.

     Fuel crops are low level, low return, but commercially stable, and will become more so as the green impact bites globally. Research and development will take the quality end of the crop and turn it into high spec., valuable standardised building sections, totally green and sustainable, for the construction of prefabricated homes both for Ireland and for export. This will increase the value of the crop considerably. Modern scientific monitoring of the first prototype house will be carried out, to ascertain its durability and eco value, its thermal insulation properties, and its commercial viability. A similar scientific approach will be taken towards the cleansing of the environment and the benefits of the system for wildlife.

     Presently a considerable importation occurs annually of thatching reed and straw. This scheme would not only reduce imports but could produce exports. Reed and coppice timber has far greater potential than just thatching, and this should be explored.
 
     Training in traditional skills and agricultural methods would be central to the scheme, as would be the marriage of these green skills and materials with 21st century technology and design.

     The use of wind or water power would be employed for basic processing of fuel or wood pellets wherever possible.

     A storage and distribution centre would be established.

     The central system of water flow and drainage, once set up, could allow for sideways expansion of the plan, land space permitting, without the need for much further expense in the infrastructure, and the model, once proven, could be replicated any number of times throughout the country, but especially on otherwise-unproductive areas such as exhausted Bord na Mona turf bogs and boggy Coillte land. From quite small to very large areas would work, especially with the central collection and distribution warehouses to handle the national crop. Small farmers with areas of poor land could benefit greatly. Those research crops from the bordering fields which showed the best potential would be further developed either adjacently or on separate sites. The potential for wealth and jobs creation is vast, as is the environmental and ecological benefit from the scheme. Initial start-up costs would be very modest, and growth would be controllable. Each module would be small compared with the national scheme of the future, and as such the whole scheme would not fail due to one factor, such as rising fossil fuel costs. Massive single businesses, while financially very successful, are also prone to sudden catastrophic collapse. This scheme would start all from the same point, that is the growing of cellulosic materials, but would have sufficient diverse outlets to protect the system as a whole. 
  The plan I have devised is to take a small area of poor quality, saturated acid land, up to 20 acres, bordered by strips of better, less acid land up to a further 20 acres, although the scheme could well be established on a much smaller area. On this would be created a pilot project for the growing of various green products. Typically the site  would be level, low-lying, and surrounded by open drainage ditches. The bottom of these drains would be full of stagnant water for much of the year, heavily polluted with nitrates, phosphates, pathogens like crypto spiridium and e-coli, and many other organic and chemical substances accumulated from the surrounding district. Heavy rain and flood conditions would periodically flush this poison into the larger watercourses and rivers.
     Within 3 years I would expect to start harvesting several commercial crops and up to 7 years would see the full development of several more. The total achievements from the site would be as follows:

Renewable fuel with negative carbon footprint.
Green construction materials.
Research and development of green buildings.
A science and technology centre.
A website for the sharing of knowledge, skills and ideas.
Tourism.
Skills and craft training and application.
Low energy farming and harvesting.
Natural energy processing and manufacturing.
Allotments and therapy gardens.
Visitor centre.
Wildlife centre.
Carbon-negative food production.
Waste treatment.
Purification of ground water and environment.
Centre for culture and heritage.

     The stagnant drains would be led into a small collection lake and from there would be circulated, ideally by wind pump, through a series of gravity-fed terraced reedbeds back to the lake.  This system would act as a flood buffer and would progressively cleanse the water through the reed roots. With the reduction of excessive fertilizers, reed quality would improve towards the final beds. The poorer quality reed would be utilised for fuel chaff or building insulation as in the prototype structure I have designed.

     Acid-tolerant reed and coppice would be at the centre of the system. Other crops would be on the border in more neutral soil. Short term produce would be thatching reed and renewable fuel from willow (investment return possibly within two years). Further fuel coppice could take between 3 to 7 years. Food crops could be from 2 years onwards up to 400 years depending on the crop. Reed will grow from the same roots every year, willow up to 7 years before becoming tired, but very easily propogated.

     Fuel crops are low level, low return, but commercially stable, and will become more so as the green impact bites globally. Research and development will take the quality end of the crop and turn it into high spec., valuable standardised building sections, totally green and sustainable, for the construction of prefabricated homes both for Ireland and for export. This will increase the value of the crop considerably. Modern scientific monitoring of the first prototype house will be carried out, to ascertain its durability and eco value, its thermal insulation properties, and its commercial viability. A similar scientific approach will be taken towards the cleansing of the environment and the benefits of the system for wildlife.

     Presently a considerable importation occurs annually of thatching reed and straw. This scheme would not only reduce imports but could produce exports. Reed and coppice timber has far greater potential than just thatching, and this should be explored.
 
     Training in traditional skills and agricultural methods would be central to the scheme, as would be the marriage of these green skills and materials with 21st century technology and design.

     The use of wind or water power would be employed for basic processing of fuel or wood pellets wherever possible.

     A storage and distribution centre would be established.

     The central system of water flow and drainage, once set up, could allow for sideways expansion of the plan, land space permitting, without the need for much further expense in the infrastructure, and the model, once proven, could be replicated any number of times throughout the country, but especially on otherwise-unproductive areas such as exhausted Bord na Mona turf bogs and boggy Coillte land. From quite small to very large areas would work, especially with the central collection and distribution warehouses to handle the national crop. Small farmers with areas of poor land could benefit greatly. Those research crops from the bordering fields which showed the best potential would be further developed either adjacently or on separate sites. The potential for wealth and jobs creation is vast, as is the environmental and ecological benefit from the scheme. Initial start-up costs would be very modest, and growth would be controllable. Each module would be small compared with the national scheme of the future, and as such the whole scheme would not fail due to one factor, such as rising fossil fuel costs. Massive single businesses, while financially very successful, are also prone to sudden catastrophic collapse. This scheme would start all from the same point, that is the growing of cellulosic materials, but would have sufficient diverse outlets to protect the system as a whole. 
  The plan I have devised is to take a small area of poor quality, saturated acid land, up to 20 acres, bordered by strips of better, less acid land up to a further 20 acres, although the scheme could well be established on a much smaller area. On this would be created a pilot project for the growing of various green products. Typically the site  would be level, low-lying, and surrounded by open drainage ditches. The bottom of these drains would be full of stagnant water for much of the year, heavily polluted with nitrates, phosphates, pathogens like crypto spiridium and e-coli, and many other organic and chemical substances accumulated from the surrounding district. Heavy rain and flood conditions would periodically flush this poison into the larger watercourses and rivers.
     Within 3 years I would expect to start harvesting several commercial crops and up to 7 years would see the full development of several more. The total achievements from the site would be as follows:

Renewable fuel with negative carbon footprint.
Green construction materials.
Research and development of green buildings.
A science and technology centre.
A website for the sharing of knowledge, skills and ideas.
Tourism.
Skills and craft training and application.
Low energy farming and harvesting.
Natural energy processing and manufacturing.
Allotments and therapy gardens.
Visitor centre.
Wildlife centre.
Carbon-negative food production.
Waste treatment.
Purification of ground water and environment.
Centre for culture and heritage.

     The stagnant drains would be led into a small collection lake and from there would be circulated, ideally by wind pump, through a series of gravity-fed terraced reedbeds back to the lake.  This system would act as a flood buffer and would progressively cleanse the water through the reed roots. With the reduction of excessive fertilizers, reed quality would improve towards the final beds. The poorer quality reed would be utilised for fuel chaff or building insulation as in the prototype structure I have designed.

     Acid-tolerant reed and coppice would be at the centre of the system. Other crops would be on the border in more neutral soil. Short term produce would be thatching reed and renewable fuel from willow (investment return possibly within two years). Further fuel coppice could take between 3 to 7 years. Food crops could be from 2 years onwards up to 400 years depending on the crop. Reed will grow from the same roots every year, willow up to 7 years before becoming tired, but very easily propogated.

     Fuel crops are low level, low return, but commercially stable, and will become more so as the green impact bites globally. Research and development will take the quality end of the crop and turn it into high spec., valuable standardised building sections, totally green and sustainable, for the construction of prefabricated homes both for Ireland and for export. This will increase the value of the crop considerably. Modern scientific monitoring of the first prototype house will be carried out, to ascertain its durability and eco value, its thermal insulation properties, and its commercial viability. A similar scientific approach will be taken towards the cleansing of the environment and the benefits of the system for wildlife.

     Presently a considerable importation occurs annually of thatching reed and straw. This scheme would not only reduce imports but could produce exports. Reed and coppice timber has far greater potential than just thatching, and this should be explored.
 
     Training in traditional skills and agricultural methods would be central to the scheme, as would be the marriage of these green skills and materials with 21st century technology and design.

     The use of wind or water power would be employed for basic processing of fuel or wood pellets wherever possible.

     A storage and distribution centre would be established.

     The central system of water flow and drainage, once set up, could allow for sideways expansion of the plan, land space permitting, without the need for much further expense in the infrastructure, and the model, once proven, could be replicated any number of times throughout the country, but especially on otherwise-unproductive areas such as exhausted Bord na Mona turf bogs and boggy Coillte land. From quite small to very large areas would work, especially with the central collection and distribution warehouses to handle the national crop. Small farmers with areas of poor land could benefit greatly. Those research crops from the bordering fields which showed the best potential would be further developed either adjacently or on separate sites. The potential for wealth and jobs creation is vast, as is the environmental and ecological benefit from the scheme. Initial start-up costs would be very modest, and growth would be controllable. Each module would be small compared with the national scheme of the future, and as such the whole scheme would not fail due to one factor, such as rising fossil fuel costs. Massive single businesses, while financially very successful, are also prone to sudden catastrophic collapse. This scheme would start all from the same point, that is the growing of cellulosic materials, but would have sufficient diverse outlets to protect the system as a whole. 
  The plan I have devised is to take a small area of poor quality, saturated acid land, up to 20 acres, bordered by strips of better, less acid land up to a further 20 acres, although the scheme could well be established on a much smaller area. On this would be created a pilot project for the growing of various green products. Typically the site  would be level, low-lying, and surrounded by open drainage ditches. The bottom of these drains would be full of stagnant water for much of the year, heavily polluted with nitrates, phosphates, pathogens like crypto spiridium and e-coli, and many other organic and chemical substances accumulated from the surrounding district. Heavy rain and flood conditions would periodically flush this poison into the larger watercourses and rivers.
     Within 3 years I would expect to start harvesting several commercial crops and up to 7 years would see the full development of several more. The total achievements from the site would be as follows:

Renewable fuel with negative carbon footprint.
Green construction materials.
Research and development of green buildings.
A science and technology centre.
A website for the sharing of knowledge, skills and ideas.
Tourism.
Skills and craft training and application.
Low energy farming and harvesting.
Natural energy processing and manufacturing.
Allotments and therapy gardens.
Visitor centre.
Wildlife centre.
Carbon-negative food production.
Waste treatment.
Purification of ground water and environment.
Centre for culture and heritage.

     The stagnant drains would be led into a small collection lake and from there would be circulated, ideally by wind pump, through a series of gravity-fed terraced reedbeds back to the lake.  This system would act as a flood buffer and would progressively cleanse the water through the reed roots. With the reduction of excessive fertilizers, reed quality would improve towards the final beds. The poorer quality reed would be utilised for fuel chaff or building insulation as in the prototype structure I have designed.

     Acid-tolerant reed and coppice would be at the centre of the system. Other crops would be on the border in more neutral soil. Short term produce would be thatching reed and renewable fuel from willow (investment return possibly within two years). Further fuel coppice could take between 3 to 7 years. Food crops could be from 2 years onwards up to 400 years depending on the crop. Reed will grow from the same roots every year, willow up to 7 years before becoming tired, but very easily propogated.

     Fuel crops are low level, low return, but commercially stable, and will become more so as the green impact bites globally. Research and development will take the quality end of the crop and turn it into high spec., valuable standardised building sections, totally green and sustainable, for the construction of prefabricated homes both for Ireland and for export. This will increase the value of the crop considerably. Modern scientific monitoring of the first prototype house will be carried out, to ascertain its durability and eco value, its thermal insulation properties, and its commercial viability. A similar scientific approach will be taken towards the cleansing of the environment and the benefits of the system for wildlife.

     Presently a considerable importation occurs annually of thatching reed and straw. This scheme would not only reduce imports but could produce exports. Reed and coppice timber has far greater potential than just thatching, and this should be explored.
 
     Training in traditional skills and agricultural methods would be central to the scheme, as would be the marriage of these green skills and materials with 21st century technology and design.

     The use of wind or water power would be employed for basic processing of fuel or wood pellets wherever possible.

     A storage and distribution centre would be established.

     The central system of water flow and drainage, once set up, could allow for sideways expansion of the plan, land space permitting, without the need for much further expense in the infrastructure, and the model, once proven, could be replicated any number of times throughout the country, but especially on otherwise-unproductive areas such as exhausted Bord na Mona turf bogs and boggy Coillte land. From quite small to very large areas would work, especially with the central collection and distribution warehouses to handle the national crop. Small farmers with areas of poor land could benefit greatly. Those research crops from the bordering fields which showed the best potential would be further developed either adjacently or on separate sites. The potential for wealth and jobs creation is vast, as is the environmental and ecological benefit from the scheme. Initial start-up costs would be very modest, and growth would be controllable. Each module would be small compared with the national scheme of the future, and as such the whole scheme would not fail due to one factor, such as rising fossil fuel costs. Massive single businesses, while financially very successful, are also prone to sudden catastrophic collapse. This scheme would start all from the same point, that is the growing of cellulosic materials, but would have sufficient diverse outlets to protect the system as a whole. 
  The plan I have devised is to take a small area of poor quality, saturated acid land, up to 20 acres, bordered by strips of better, less acid land up to a further 20 acres, although the scheme could well be established on a much smaller area. On this would be created a pilot project for the growing of various green products. Typically the site  would be level, low-lying, and surrounded by open drainage ditches. The bottom of these drains would be full of stagnant water for much of the year, heavily polluted with nitrates, phosphates, pathogens like crypto spiridium and e-coli, and many other organic and chemical substances accumulated from the surrounding district. Heavy rain and flood conditions would periodically flush this poison into the larger watercourses and rivers.
     Within 3 years I would expect to start harvesting several commercial crops and up to 7 years would see the full development of several more. The total achievements from the site would be as follows:

Renewable fuel with negative carbon footprint.
Green construction materials.
Research and development of green buildings.
A science and technology centre.
A website for the sharing of knowledge, skills and ideas.
Tourism.
Skills and craft training and application.
Low energy farming and harvesting.
Natural energy processing and manufacturing.
Allotments and therapy gardens.
Visitor centre.
Wildlife centre.
Carbon-negative food production.
Waste treatment.
Purification of ground water and environment.
Centre for culture and heritage.

     The stagnant drains would be led into a small collection lake and from there would be circulated, ideally by wind pump, through a series of gravity-fed terraced reedbeds back to the lake.  This system would act as a flood buffer and would progressively cleanse the water through the reed roots. With the reduction of excessive fertilizers, reed quality would improve towards the final beds. The poorer quality reed would be utilised for fuel chaff or building insulation as in the prototype structure I have designed.

     Acid-tolerant reed and coppice would be at the centre of the system. Other crops would be on the border in more neutral soil. Short term produce would be thatching reed and renewable fuel from willow (investment return possibly within two years). Further fuel coppice could take between 3 to 7 years. Food crops could be from 2 years onwards up to 400 years depending on the crop. Reed will grow from the same roots every year, willow up to 7 years before becoming tired, but very easily propogated.

     Fuel crops are low level, low return, but commercially stable, and will become more so as the green impact bites globally. Research and development will take the quality end of the crop and turn it into high spec., valuable standardised building sections, totally green and sustainable, for the construction of prefabricated homes both for Ireland and for export. This will increase the value of the crop considerably. Modern scientific monitoring of the first prototype house will be carried out, to ascertain its durability and eco value, its thermal insulation properties, and its commercial viability. A similar scientific approach will be taken towards the cleansing of the environment and the benefits of the system for wildlife.

     Presently a considerable importation occurs annually of thatching reed and straw. This scheme would not only reduce imports but could produce exports. Reed and coppice timber has far greater potential than just thatching, and this should be explored.
 
     Training in traditional skills and agricultural methods would be central to the scheme, as would be the marriage of these green skills and materials with 21st century technology and design.

     The use of wind or water power would be employed for basic processing of fuel or wood pellets wherever possible.

     A storage and distribution centre would be established.

     The central system of water flow and drainage, once set up, could allow for sideways expansion of the plan, land space permitting, without the need for much further expense in the infrastructure, and the model, once proven, could be replicated any number of times throughout the country, but especially on otherwise-unproductive areas such as exhausted Bord na Mona turf bogs and boggy Coillte land. From quite small to very large areas would work, especially with the central collection and distribution warehouses to handle the national crop. Small farmers with areas of poor land could benefit greatly. Those research crops from the bordering fields which showed the best potential would be further developed either adjacently or on separate sites. The potential for wealth and jobs creation is vast, as is the environmental and ecological benefit from the scheme. Initial start-up costs would be very modest, and growth would be controllable. Each module would be small compared with the national scheme of the future, and as such the whole scheme would not fail due to one factor, such as rising fossil fuel costs. Massive single businesses, while financially very successful, are also prone to sudden catastrophic collapse. This scheme would start all from the same point, that is the growing of cellulosic materials, but would have sufficient diverse outlets to protect the system as a whole. 
  The plan I have devised is to take a small area of poor quality, saturated acid land, up to 20 acres, bordered by strips of better, less acid land up to a further 20 acres, although the scheme could well be established on a much smaller area. On this would be created a pilot project for the growing of various green products. Typically the site  would be level, low-lying, and surrounded by open drainage ditches. The bottom of these drains would be full of stagnant water for much of the year, heavily polluted with nitrates, phosphates, pathogens like crypto spiridium and e-coli, and many other organic and chemical substances accumulated from the surrounding district. Heavy rain and flood conditions would periodically flush this poison into the larger watercourses and rivers.
     Within 3 years I would expect to start harvesting several commercial crops and up to 7 years would see the full development of several more. The total achievements from the site would be as follows:

Renewable fuel with negative carbon footprint.
Green construction materials.
Research and development of green buildings.
A science and technology centre.
A website for the sharing of knowledge, skills and ideas.
Tourism.
Skills and craft training and application.
Low energy farming and harvesting.
Natural energy processing and manufacturing.
Allotments and therapy gardens.
Visitor centre.
Wildlife centre.
Carbon-negative food production.
Waste treatment.
Purification of ground water and environment.
Centre for culture and heritage.

     The stagnant drains would be led into a small collection lake and from there would be circulated, ideally by wind pump, through a series of gravity-fed terraced reedbeds back to the lake.  This system would act as a flood buffer and would progressively cleanse the water through the reed roots. With the reduction of excessive fertilizers, reed quality would improve towards the final beds. The poorer quality reed would be utilised for fuel chaff or building insulation as in the prototype structure I have designed.

     Acid-tolerant reed and coppice would be at the centre of the system. Other crops would be on the border in more neutral soil. Short term produce would be thatching reed and renewable fuel from willow (investment return possibly within two years). Further fuel coppice could take between 3 to 7 years. Food crops could be from 2 years onwards up to 400 years depending on the crop. Reed will grow from the same roots every year, willow up to 7 years before becoming tired, but very easily propogated.

     Fuel crops are low level, low return, but commercially stable, and will become more so as the green impact bites globally. Research and development will take the quality end of the crop and turn it into high spec., valuable standardised building sections, totally green and sustainable, for the construction of prefabricated homes both for Ireland and for export. This will increase the value of the crop considerably. Modern scientific monitoring of the first prototype house will be carried out, to ascertain its durability and eco value, its thermal insulation properties, and its commercial viability. A similar scientific approach will be taken towards the cleansing of the environment and the benefits of the system for wildlife.

     Presently a considerable importation occurs annually of thatching reed and straw. This scheme would not only reduce imports but could produce exports. Reed and coppice timber has far greater potential than just thatching, and this should be explored.
 
     Training in traditional skills and agricultural methods would be central to the scheme, as would be the marriage of these green skills and materials with 21st century technology and design.

     The use of wind or water power would be employed for basic processing of fuel or wood pellets wherever possible.

     A storage and distribution centre would be established.

     The central system of water flow and drainage, once set up, could allow for sideways expansion of the plan, land space permitting, without the need for much further expense in the infrastructure, and the model, once proven, could be replicated any number of times throughout the country, but especially on otherwise-unproductive areas such as exhausted Bord na Mona turf bogs and boggy Coillte land. From quite small to very large areas would work, especially with the central collection and distribution warehouses to handle the national crop. Small farmers with areas of poor land could benefit greatly. Those research crops from the bordering fields which showed the best potential would be further developed either adjacently or on separate sites. The potential for wealth and jobs creation is vast, as is the environmental and ecological benefit from the scheme. Initial start-up costs would be very modest, and growth would be controllable. Each module would be small compared with the national scheme of the future, and as such the whole scheme would not fail due to one factor, such as rising fossil fuel costs. Massive single businesses, while financially very successful, are also prone to sudden catastrophic collapse. This scheme would start all from the same point, that is the growing of cellulosic materials, but would have sufficient diverse outlets to protect the system as a whole. 
While we all show concern for the Planet, we also seem hell bent on social, economic and environmental disaster. It's a symptom of human needs worldwide, and Greenpeat is a chance to offer alternatives, built from a simple beginning.

The plan I have devised is to create a self sustaining community whose carbon footprint, on balance, is zero. The scheme and its message may then be replicated nationally and worldwide.

This website may well be the means of focusing all the effort, knowledge and funding currently spread around in separate schemes. I have created it as a non-profit site. The advanced ideas explored here would become economically and ecologically self-sustaining, eventually to virtually dispense with the use of fossil fuels.

There is very little time left. Global warming is indisputable, is caused by Man, and will accelerate dramatically in decades rather than centuries.

My plan will address the few basic needs of civilisation and offer ways of satisfying or changing them in a way which will soon be seen as not just desirable, but essential for the future of the World.

 


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